Seamwork Brit

As soon as I saw the Seamwork Brit and the bonus variation, I knew I had to have it. Although, I wasn’t interested in making the dress. I have been lusting after a top with a ruffle detail for ages. I was actually going to design one myself using the Cashmerette Concord t-shirt pattern but hadn’t gotten around to it and didn’t really want to. The sleeves on the Brit pattern are a bonus, too! I absolutely love a bishop sleeve.

I shortened the pattern by about 8 inches. I wanted the top hem to hit my low hip so I didn’t want to take out too much length. I cut out a size 24 and the only modification I did was shorten it to a top. I have to say that the fit is lovely. The sleeves fit nicely and the top fits over my bust and back really well. I think the pattern is going to become a TNT (Tried and Tested) pattern. I honestly don’t think I have any changes I would make for the next versions.

The fabric I used is a bright blue with white stripes knit. I got it from Tanya during a destash a while ago. I have been hoarding the fabric ever since. It’s a very lightweight knit with a nice drape perfect for the sleeves as well as not being too thick for the layers in the ruffle.

In the curvy range, the pattern has a centre back seam to help with the fit. Not that I needed it since it fits great.

The sleeves are lovely. The bands are a bit tight in this knit for rolling up sleeves; although, not around my wrist. But just be aware that if you occasionally roll up your sleeves, the pattern might need a slight modification here or a stretchier fabric.

TL:DR Review

  • Pattern: Seamwork Brit and the bonus variation
  • Pros: I could wear this top all the time. I love it so much!
  • Cons: No cons imho. It’s a great pattern.
  • Make again?: I have a ton more version planned including one that uses lace for the yoke above the ruffle. ❤
  • Rating: pink-star-black-md pink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-md5/5 stars

Burda Tie Sleeve Dress

 

I love this dress from Burda issue 02/2018. The dress is made for woven fabric but I knew it was destined for this crepe knit fabric. I adapted the pattern for knit fabric but not doing my usual FBA, omitting the zipper, and relying on negative ease by only adding a scant 1/4 inch seam allowance. I think it worked very well.

 

Because the knit fabric has a white backing, I needed to make a facing for the ties so that the wrong side didn’t show. Due to fabric constraints, I couldn’t make the facings extend to the split or hem. Instead, they are just facings for the ties.

 

The fit is not perfect. The fabric was bizarrely difficult to cut so some seams are not as straight as they could be (see the centre back seam above). The side seams are pulling back so I definitely need a full butt adjustment back there.

The upper sleeve could also use slightly more room.

I shortened the skirt by about 5 inches (in a super accurate way of folding out the length until it fit on the fabric) and added massive pockets that are sewn into the waist so they sit nicely.

 

In spite of those minor issues, which are mostly hidden by the busy pattern of the fabric, I adore this dress and feel amazing in it.

TL:DR Review

  • Pattern: Dress from Burda issue 02/2018
  • Pros: I love the final result! I think it looks great on me.
  • Cons: The usual cons with Burda patterns. Really long. Bad instructions. But it was an easy creation and overall really nice.
  • Make again?: I will definitely make it again. I would like to make it in a woven fabric, too.
  • Rating: pink-star-black-md pink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-md5/5 stars

Velvet Gothic Dress: Halla Patterns dress

Another dress that I made a while ago is this velvet dress from Halla Patterns. I don’t like the name of the pattern. A kimono is a specific cultural garment from Japan and, while this dress may have a kimono sleeve and be inspired by kimonos, it is not a kimono and I will not be referring to it as such. Please read this post and I encourage you to follow @little_kotos_closet on Instagram. In the past, I have maintained the name of the pattern, but going forward I will not. I realize that makes it more difficult for people to search for my post if they are looking for others that make the pattern. I’m just hoping that going forward, there won’t be this issue. The Wiksten jacket has already been renamed to the Wiksten Haori jacket.

In November, the Toronto Sewcialists met up and had a fancy dress party with a sewing session before. I wasn’t initially going to make a new item for the fancy dress party, but then I bought this gorgeous velvet fabric from a local store, Fabric by Designers, that was going out of business but managed to extend their lease again so they are back in business. I managed to grab 4 yards of this velvet fabric for a decent price along with some ponte and doubleknit in their sale. I love this fabric. It’s soft and drapes so nicely. It washes really well, too.

I had also just put the Halla dress pattern together and then got a vision in my head of a floor length dress with voluminous sleeves. The resulting dress is gorgeous, moody af, and makes me think that I should be wondering the North York moors of Yorkshire, England, singing Kate Bush’s Wuthering Heights. Fun fact, I’m actually first gen Canadian on my dad’s side and he was born in Yorkshire. He also immigrated to Canada on a boat in the late 50s. I haven’t ever been to Yorkshire sadly. I hope to one day, though.

I made a size 28 graded to a 30 at the waist. I changed the skirt to a longer and slightly narrower skirt. It still has a lot of volume but not quite as much as the original pattern. I left off the pockets since they interrupted the drape of the skirt.

Here I am surprised by the ghosts of Catherine and Heathcliff.

Overall, the fit of the bodice is okay. The front needs a bit more length due to my large bust. While the pattern has different cup sizes, I do still need a bit more room to get tue waistband to sit in the correct location. You can see the waistband going up a bit as a result. I think also a shorter waistband would look better. I think this ends up being close to 3 inches long finished but waistbands work better on me when they are less than 2 inches long.

To get the longer sleeve, I just extended the sleeve by about 10 inches and added elastic to the hem. I didn’t want the elastic to be super tight just give the look of gathered cuffs.

Overall, the pattern was good. Good instructions. I like how the neckline is completely faced with self-fabric and then the whole thing is constructed together so that the facing stays in place. It’s pretty smart.

I enjoyed being moody and Gothic for this photoshoot. Makes the inner 90s goth in me feel pretty fantastic.

TL:DR Review

  • Pattern: Halla Patterns dress
  • Pros: I love this dress. The pattern went together well and the instructions were good.
  • Cons: The bust fit could be better. With HH cups, it’s difficult to get a perfect fit even with cup sizes. Next time I will lengthen the front bodice by about 2.5 inches and shorten the waistband by half.
  • Make again?: Absolutely.
  • Rating: pink-star-black-md pink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-md5/5 stars

So done with Healthcliff’s shit.

Decades of Style Ophelia Overalls

Today I am sharing my Ophelia Overalls from Decades of Style. Usual disclaimer: I was given the pattern for free to test it out and share on social media. All opinions are my own.

I’ve been wanting to make overalls for a while now. Overalls were my favourite thing to wear in the 90s. I owned a pair of wide legged overalls in a lightweight denim fabric that I absolutely loved. I wore them all the time in spite of my sister poking fun at me and saying I could be a farmer in those overalls, to quote Clueless.

I loved those overalls and was recently thinking that I needed to replicate them since the style was coming back. Let’s be honest, style be damned; overalls are super comfortable.

When Janet, the mastermind behind Decades of Style, sent me the pattern information, I said yes immediately. I also knew immediately that the polkadot chambray in my stash was perfect for it.

Before I cut anything out, I did two things: 1) I compared the crotch curve of the pattern to my Blank Slate Forsythe Trousers and 2) I did a muslin of the pattern in a shorter length since the patterns requires a lot of fabric.

The crotch curve was almost a perfect match. All I did before making the muslin was scoop out the front crotch curve.

My muslin turned out well. It revealed that I would need a full belly adjustment. I also narrowed the width at the top of the bib by about an inch to account for my narrower upper frame. I didn’t want the straps slipping off.

 

 

The result in my final version is awesome. There are still some very minor fit issues. I do think a bit more of a full belly adjustment would help it. I also forgot to adjust the side panels for the increased length so they matched correctly. I will do that for my next version.

 

The result is so adorable and reminiscent of Rosie the Riveter that I am in absolute love with it. I did red topstitching, which while not perfectly even, is perfectly acceptable. I love the loose style of the overalls with the ties to cinch in the waist. They are comfortable and flowy.

 

Of course, it being Canada and the middle of winter….I will probably not wear this outside the house until the Spring. But I can always sew in them.

The other bonus of this pattern is those massive pockets. I can definitely start a revolution with those.

 

Finally, I will leave you with this note. Unlike a onesie or jumpsuit, the overalls don’t leave you naked when you pee. Hahhah.

For the pattern launch, there is a discount for 20% on the entire purchase with code OVER20 and it will run for 2 weeks.

TL:DR Review

  • Pattern: Decades of Style Ophelia Overalls
  • Pros: I love big pockets and I can’t lie. Those wide legged pants are so fly.
  • Cons: Doing pattern adjustments are slightly tough but that’s only because of the number of pattern pieces and that my brain couldn’t remember that the sides would need adjusting. There is a sewalong that will cover some adjustments.
  • Make again?: YES! I am actually going to go back and finish the muslin shorts I made since they just need a couple minor adjustments to be wearable.
  • Rating: pink-star-black-md pink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-md5/5 stars

DIBY Club Gabriela Onesie

Originally published on the CSC.

Do you have a sewing bucket list? I’m slowly making my way through mine. Basically, it’s a list of things that I want to sew at some point in my life. When I first started sewing years ago, things like sewing my own bra, swimsuit, pants, coat were on the list. I’ve made it through a lot of that list, but I still have a lot on my bucket list. Sewing a onesie may seem like a strange thing to put on a sewing bucket list, but it was for sure on mine. For anyone who knows me, they know I love some really strange things fashion wise. I really wanted to make a onesie. They look comfortable, fun to wear, and great for lounging around the house. Plus, a good pattern might be useful for some cosplay opportunities and you know I love cosplay!

Do it Yourself Better Club reached out to the CSC a few months ago asking if we’d review some of their patterns in exchange for a free pattern. A few of us leaped at the opportunity. When I saw the Gabriela Onesie, I asked to review it. The pattern goes up to a size 36, which translates to 63″ full bust, 59.75″ waist, and 67″ full hip. It’s a pretty generous size range. A few years ago it was tough to find a onesie that even went up to a 45″ hip let alone a 67″ hip. It’s great to see a company have such a great size range. Of course, there can always be more done in that area, but I was pleased to not be at the top of the size range and to see that some of their testers looked like me! Visibility is meaningful.

I chose a size 22 graded to a size 26 at the hip. I also shortened the top at the waist and hip lines by a total of 4 inches. The total height of the pattern is 5’5″. I am 5’3″ but I have a shorter torso so I measured myself in a few spots and decided to reduce the torso by 4 inches. I made no other changes to the pattern.

The fit is actually pretty good in the front. I can even put my arms over my head without creating a camel toe which is a huge success I think for a onesie. The back does require a slight full butt adjustment, but no change in the overall length of the torso since there is no issue at the sides just that slight wedgie it’s giving me. Haha. Since I chose the capri length, I am not sure whether I will need to shorten the full length version; although given that the capri length is just above my ankles, I likely do need to adjust the full length version. DIBY Club does give the inseam length of 30.5 inches and since my inseam is 26 inches, I would be able to guess that I need an adjustment for the inseam as well. Just goes to prove that although I am only 2 inches shorter than the height the pattern drafts for, our bodies are complex and often require additional measurements to get the right fit.

I’m thoroughly impressed with the information DIBY Club gives its customers as well as the extensive instructions they provide. On one level, as an intermediate sewist, I find the sheer number of pages to print a bit ridiculous, but on another level, depending on your skills, the instructions are very useful, especially in terms of fitting the pattern to your body. I think for most beginners that skill is so difficult to learn and DIBY Club helps you with that. I followed their instructions for blending between sizes and shortening the torso length as well. It was very useful.

Construction-wise there is nothing to complain about. Every notch matched up well and I didn’t have any trouble following their instructions for the zipper or for any part of the onesie. It went together fast.

Now let’s talk logistics with a onesie, because I haven’t worn one as an adult so I had no clue what to expect….except for all the hilarious cartoons on going to the bathroom in a jumpsuit…

I haven’t worn overalls or a jumpsuit either since my early 20s. This onesie gives me an idea of what that would be like since those types of patterns keep on trending. I chose to make the functional bum flap thinking it would be easy to use. I have velcro on it to close it. Let’s just say…reaching around to open up the velcro and close it again is NOT easy. Add on to that, my chronic illness makes my shoulders dislocate easily so I abandoned using that pretty darn quickly. The alternative is using the zipper in front and effectively becoming naked every time I am wearing the onesie. The nice thing is that I am just at home and we don’t have little kids opening the bathroom door anymore to ask for things (although, my stepkids never really did that thankfully!). Phew. Logistically, onesies are a little bit awkward… That being said, they are so comfortable. It’s wonderful to not have waistbands.

Future versions won’t include the functional bum flap since I couldn’t even use it.

Let’s talk fabric. This onesie called for French Terry, jersey, 4-way sweatshirt fleece or sweater knit. Knits with at least 50% stretch horizontally and 20% vertically. I got some really awesome Disney princess cotton lycra from Funky Monkey Fabrics and used some solid pink bamboo knit that I got locally for the contrasts on the cuffs, pockets, and bum flap. Cotton lycra tends to be pretty expensive here in Canada especially if you are going for licensed prints. These are definitely the most expensive pjs I’ve ever made. The awesome thing is that they are probably going to become my most worn pjs ever and hopefully will last a bit. I have some of the jersey left and plan on making some pj shorts with it and a tank top in the pink bamboo knit for a matching top.

All in all, I am confident that I will be making this pattern again for pjs. I’m not sure about going forward to adapt it for cosplay purposes due to the awkward bathroom situations…. But I’ll never say never! I mean I think most people who cosplay in onesies wear an undershirt and some kind of shorts under…

TL:DR Review

  • Pattern: DIBY Gabriela Onesie
  • Pros: Great size range. Incredibly easy to follow instructions. Comfortable to the max!
  • Cons: Butt flap not so functional for me but that is my weird bendy/fall apartness. So many pages to print. Maybe save some trees and use a digital copy of the instructions…
  • Make again?: I already have some wicked unicorn cotton lycra that my mom bought me for another version. ❤ ❤
  • Rating: pink-star-black-md pink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-md5/5 stars

Decades of Style T.L.C. Caftan

Disclaimer: I received this pattern for free but my opinion, my awesomeness, and fabric is my own.

The Decades Everyday T.L.C. Caftan is out today!!!! I might be a little bit excited.

  

Let your inner Mrs. Roper out!

The T.L.C. Caftan is in Decades of Style extended sizing (YESSSSS!). It goes up to a 52 inch bust (YESSSSS!). DOS has gone to great lengths to make a caftan that will look stylish and be comfortable. The faux wrap bodice is genius with the waistband. There are ties on the inside to pull the waistband to whatever tightness you want (cheese room!). It emphasizes curves so that a plus sized person doesn’t just look like they are wrapped in a bunch of fabric. There are two options to it: shorter sleeves and skirt or longer sleeves and skirt. It also has pockets hidden in the seam for the side panels and front skirt.

 

The only drawback is that this pattern needs a huge amount of fabric (edit: Check out the awesome ideas in the sewalong post for using different fabrics!). The full length takes around 6 yards! But the positive spin of that is the stashbusting possibilities! 😉 I am also thinking of making this in tunic length. I could see it being a really pretty tunic.

 

 

For the bodice, I made size 20 bodice and did a 3 inch FBA as per the instructions we were given (edit: Also in this post on the sewalong). DOS is going to include them in the sewalong so there is no guessing when making an FBA for this. Even though the size 26 would have worked for my bust measurements, I chose to do an FBA, because I wanted the smaller shoulders and neckline to prevent gaping and I did. There is no gaping for me and the wrap bodice comes up higher as well covering my bra nicely. I did use the size 26 skirt pieces and side panels.

 

 

I have no issues with the fit. The only change for next time is to rotate the dart into the shoulder gathers and the waist gathers. I chose not to do that for this version because I was being lazy but with the sheer fabric you can really see the darts so I don’t want that for the next version.

I used white cotton swiss dot with some plain white cotton fabric for the waistbands and the armhole finish as well as the ties inside since I didn’t have white twill tape handy. I added florescent yellow pompom trim to the sleeves and the hem.

Use the code CAFTAN20 for 20% off your order at the checkout.

TL:DR Review

  • Pattern: Decades Everyday T.L.C. Caftan 
  • Pros: Love the waistband and faux wrap. Love the pockets. Love it all. Love love love love.
  • Cons: Only con is how much fabric I need to make all the caftans.
  • Make again?: ALL. THE. CAFTANS.
  • Rating: pink-star-black-md pink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-md5/5 stars

Cashmerette Belmont Leggings

Today I am sharing my Cashmerette Belmont leggings. Earlier this week, I shared my Cedar Dolman top. Both the Cedar set and the Belmont set were released together and tested together. I haven’t tried the Cedar tank or the Belmont yoga pants, but both are on my list to try. As with the Cedar top, I tested the Belmont leggings and received the final pattern for free. But my opinions are my own and definitely not from a robot or created by predictive text. HA!

The Belmont leggings have side seams and inner seams as well as a separate waistband. I thought I would hate all those seams, but I actually don’t and it makes it easier to squeeze them into a small amount of fabric. My TNT leggings pattern has just one pattern piece. I took apart Old Navy leggings to make it. However, the inner seams on the legs twist about no matter the fabric type and the rise is always a bit off depending on the fabric. I was coming to the conclusion that I either needed to tweak it or finally find a good pattern for leggings when Jenny messaged me about the testing on the Belmont leggings.

I have tried Cake Patterns Espresso leggings and Patterns for Pirates Peg Legs and hated both. They were very tight, very long (hello 5’3″ here!), and just didn’t work out for me.

I’ll be honest, my tester version weren’t as good. Which is why I am so never sharing them here! I do have pictures of me with the waistband pulled up really high that are funny, but I’d prefer to keep them for private laughs.

My final version of these is so close to perfect! I made a size 24. The only adjustment I made was to cut off about 5 inches in length, my standard for pants/leggings. I also added a cuff to the bottom since hemming knits is the WORST (#lazytips).

The fabric I used is a fleece-back poly from Water Tower Textiles in Heather Navy. The texture of the right side of the fabric is smooth and soft to the touch with a bit of a “wind proof” feel to it. The wrong side is a super soft fleece. The fabric is thinner than I expected. My experience of fleece-back poly is that it is pretty thick. I don’t find the warmth is lost by the thinner fabric, though. If anything, it makes them a bit more breathable, but still keep the heat in when walking around.

 

I love the leggings. I squeezed this pair into 1 metre of the fleece-back poly (shortened by 5 inches) which makes them a great project for small amounts of fabric.

There are literally no adjustments I would make for future versions of these. They fit perfectly.

Of note, the top I am wearing is a lovely bamboo/viscose Concord tank top. It’s so soft and comfy. I usually throw it on as pjs, because it is like being wrapped in a blanket.

TL:DR Review

  • Pattern: Cashmerette Belmont Leggings
  • Pros: Everything! I adore this pattern!
  • Cons:  Um?
  • Make again?: Absolutely! I have fabric for 4 more pairs in more fleece-back poly from Water Tower Textiles (they should start sponsoring me….ha!).
  • Rating: pink-star-black-md pink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-md5/5 stars