McCall’s 7094 and an evolving wardrobe

Back when I hacked my Cashmerette Springfield top into a pussybow, I kind of felt like my wardrobe was making some pretty substantial shifts in a new but not completely different direction. I’ve always leaned toward vintage-inspired looks and the way my wardrobe is going is not much different, but maybe a bit more “grown up.” I shudder at that, though, because I think if you are an adult everything you do and wear is adulting. If you choose to wear “twee” outfits, you are still an adult and, to me, there is nothing wrong with that, especially because I love wearing “twee” outfits. Right now, though, I have visions of gorgeous 1940s style blouses and blazers with either skirts or wide-legged, high waisted trousers or shirtdresses galore.

I want to use more lush fabrics like rayons and silks and linens and I want to use different techniques like pin tucks, lace insets, embroidery and I might make everything with ruffles or puffed sleeves…

I don’t think these changes will automatic, but you might notice it all over time. It’s going to fun no matter what because it means sewing and probably buying fabric. ūüėČ

I’ve had McCall’s 7094 in my pattern stash for a really long time. Out of print but still available on the website. This was released at the end of 2014 (as per Michelle’s blog post) and I know I got it shortly after that, because that release contained a McCall’s 7084, which I used for my wedding dress and started early in 2015. It goes to show you how often I buy patterns and how often I use patterns….

This pattern just sort of got moved off my sewing list and back on a few times and never quite made it because of shiny things.

I  made M7094 in view D, but with shorter sleeves. I used XXL. According to the size chart, XXL is 24/26 or 46/48 inches at the bust. I am 51 inches at the bust, but the pattern runs large so it fit fine at the bust. However, I did make adjustments to the sleeves and widen them at the sleeve head for a puffed sleeve look.

 

The fit is just as expected. It’s a loose-fitting top that skims over my hips. I think there are some improvements for next time. The back is a bit tight on me and for someone with a narrow back that is a bit weird… The pattern called for cutting out one yoke, but that would have not been very pretty inside so I cut 2 yokes and used the burrito method. It’s possible that is causing the back to feel a bit tighter than the pattern intended. I will also lower the armsyce a bit since it is a little pinchy. This is also not often an issue that I have. I usually use smaller sizes and then do an FBA so I am confused why this issue is popping up just with this top. I haven’t read through all the pattern reviews to know if it common. Both are easy enough fixes, though. The other strange thing is that the sleeve hem is a bit off and doesn’t sit straight. I think the likely issue there is because of the armsyce so I will correct that first and then see if the sleeve hem corrects itself becuase it is not being pulled up by a too-tight armsyce.

Let’s talk about that collar. I fucking love that collar. It was incredibly difficult to put in, but thanks to the genius suggestion of using a glue stick for collars from a few people in Instagram stories (Makerheart, Closet Case Files, True Bias and a few others that I can’t remember sorry). I freaked out over this tip and started using it for everything. Talk about a game changer. Now the collar sits a bit higher than the model in the pattern picture, but I like where it is sitting so I don’t want to mess with that.


I am trying to remember to pull my hair out of the way for pictures of the back of garments but I forget so I often have two pictures of the back. Haha. Also, how long is my hair? Sheesh. I’ve taken some pictures lately and I think I understand why people keep commenting about the length. Oh and I have bangs now! I am in love with them. I’ve had bangs before but never with long hair like this and I really love the look.

The placket was incredibly difficult to sew in as well. It has pleats in it. The instructions were also just not making sense to me. I think I will use a different method next time since this method has raw edges on the inside. I prefer the method where you are hiding them all within the placket itself and then sewing an “x” in a box on the front side. I should have just gone with my instincts and used that method, but I was trying to follow directions. In the end, I just ended up moving the raw edges inside and topstitching over the bottom edge. It’s not the prettiest finish, but you can’t really tell.

I love the hem of the shirt. I have another garment to share soon with a similar hem so it seems like I am being drawn to these types of hems lately.

The fabric I used is a poly crepe in navy with orange squiggly lines. It’s not the best material to wear for say…Summer, but it works in my office. I really love the look of the top tucked into a skirt.

It’s definitely going to become a classic in my wardrobe.

TL:DR Review

  • Pattern: McCall’s 7094
  • Pros:¬†Fits larger than the pattern sizes indicate. Loose-fitting top with lots of great details and that collar!
  • Cons:¬†Fits larger than the pattern sizes indicate… So look at the finished garment measurements for a size with the amount of ease you like. Confusing placket instructions (or maybe that was me…).
  • Make again?:¬†I already have fabric for another!
  • Rating:¬†pink-star-black-md¬†pink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-md4/5 stars

Patterns for Pirates Siren Swim Top and Sailor Swim Bottoms and Designer Stitch Willow Kimono

My last sewn items in 2018 were all for our trip to Cuba. I made two bathing suit sets using the Patterns for Pirates Siren Swim Top and Hello Sailor Swim Bottoms, Blank Slate Forsythe Trousers in a capri length (I’ll review this in February since I plan on making some more fit tweaks for a pant length version and do not have any pictures ready for the capris), Designer Stitch Willow Kimono, and a pair of Blank Slate Barton shorts in a hot pink nylon for wearing around on the beach (I have more of this material and want to make a couple more pairs of these in various lengths).

I first made the Siren Swim Top and Hello Sailor Swim Bottoms back in the summer before we went to Niagara Falls for a fun weekend. I made 2X in the top and 3X for the bottom.

 

The construction of both was not easy for me at the time. I actually dislocated my left thumb for the first time trying to sew on the elastic. That plus the fact that they didn’t fit great PLUS I cut the anchors upside down made me not want to wear them. We didn’t end up swimming during the vacation anyway. I wasn’t feeling confident about the construction and didn’t want to accidentally fall out of my suit. ūüė¶ It’s a complete bummer when you have such cute fabric! The fabric is from Emerald Studio and very nice quality. I decided to buy more of it so that I could make it again. Erin doesn’t have any more of the matching hot pink fabric, but there was a suitable replacement at Water Tower Textiles along with a bunch of other ones! Both Canadian shops! ūüėÄ

I learned a lot during construction of the suit, but wasn’t motivated to make another until we booked our trip to Cuba. I knew the alterations I needed. I needed to add two inches to the top length to accommodate my bust and add two inches to the centre back of the bottoms since I have booty. I also needed to reduce the width of both the bottom band of the top and the waistband of the bottoms to really get a good fit. The pattern has cut lines based on the difference between your overbust and full bust which is an okay method, but not perfect. Even though, my difference is 7 inches, I still needed to add a bit more length. Of course, part of that has to do with using powermesh to line it and making it less stretchy, but the pattern doesn’t really accommodate for projection or underbust. For the anchor version, I added powermesh to the front and not the back of the top and then lined the whole thing with swimsuit lining. I lined the bottoms with swimsuit lining also from Emerald Studio.

  

In the next two versions, I used powermesh to line the top and lined the bottoms with swimsuit lining or black swim fabric depending on what I had left. I believe the black/mermaid scales are lined mostly with black swim fabric (except in the crotch area that has swimsuit lining) and the purple bottoms lined with swimsuit lining. I like the structure the black swim bottoms have in comparison to the purple bottoms. The purple fabric is also a bit thinner than the black fabric so there is less structure overall in that suit.

 

Both are constructed much better than the first pair and had no issues with dislocating my fingers during the construction process. I really love the backs of both suits. The criss-crossing straps are really lovely. The additional length changed it so that the 2-piece suit now looks like a 1-piece suit, which is more to my taste. I loved the original suit I made, but I definitely feel more comfortable in this look. The 2-piece is easier to get on that a 1-piece for me, but I didn’t want to be exposed in my mid section. Mostly due to having to apply more sunscreen and not wanting a burn there!

I did not like the suggested construction methods for a lot of things in the patterns. The bottoms have you sewing the elastic in and then turning the hem over leaving the crotch a lot smaller than I would prefer. I added bands to the legs and sewed the elastic on with one side of the band and then folded the other side of the band over to enclose the elastic in the band. It was much easier for me to do and meant I could wait to cut the elastic and had more of it to grip. I stretched the elastic as I sewed in order to get everything cinched in perfectly. I used this swim elastic from Emerald Studio. It’s seriously good quality and I highly recommend it. I used the same method of enclosing the elastic in the bands for the waistband and the bottom band on the top. The top has elastic at the neckline and under the arms. These are enclosed in the lining already.

I used the serger for all construction. The only alteration from these two versions would be to either cut the straps shorter or stabilize them somehow. I found that as I swam they stretched out. I also plan on making the bands a bit shorter still on the waistband and the bottom band for the top. I may actually line them with powernet. The powernet was from Emerald Studio again. Yes, the post is one long advertisement for Emerald Studio. Hah. I was not paid in any way for this. I just really love Emerald Studio.

 

The cover up I am wearing is the Designer Stitch Willow Kimono. I won it during the Monthly Stitch Indie Pattern month. I made it with a lovely cotton voile and it is soft and drapey for a cotton. I trimmed it using a fringe for the and pom-pom trim for the arms. Construction was fairly easy and the overall structure of the pattern is easy. It’s 5 pieces of fabric: 2 front pieces, 1 back piece, and 2 pieces for the band for around the neckline and sides. I would definitely make it again. I made size 10 based on my measurements. It fits large and makes a nice beach coverup. I would have been far far more sunburnt without it.

TL:DR Review

  • Pattern:¬†Patterns for Pirates Siren Swim Top and Hello Sailor Swim Bottoms
  • Pros:¬†I love the result for the black and purple swimsuits.
  • Cons:¬†The pattern without modifications isn’t perfect and the method for adjusting the bust isn’t solid. The instructions are in pictures, which I personally find difficult to see versus illustrations.
  • Make again?:¬†Absolutely. I’d be interested to move on to more complicated swimsuits, but this is a great beginner pattern.
  • Rating:¬†pink-star-black-md¬†pink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdwhite-star-black-md4/5 stars
  • Pattern:¬†Designer Stitch Willow Kimono
  • Pros:¬†It’s a great pattern!
  • Cons:¬†I’m not sure there are cons. It’s a simple pattern with a decent size range.
  • Make again?:¬†Absolutely!
  • Rating:¬†pink-star-black-md¬†pink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-md5/5 stars

Burda Cowl Neck Top

The Burda cowl neck top (10/2011#135)¬†was part of my 2017 Make Nine so I wanted to share it for that reason. I don’t love it, but I don’t hate it. I really think the issues are due to the fabric. The top really requires a fabric with enough drape to make the cowl really look gorgeous. On the bolt, the fabric appeared to be nice and drapey, but it wasn’t really. It washed up a bit crisper as well. A knit with rayon would work beautifully in this top.

20171106_153019 20171106_153032

The top has raglan sleeves and an inset for the front and back for the neckline/cowl. The sleeves are also in the original pattern ruched at the side from forearm to hem. I chose to make sleeve bands instead since I doubted I would like the ruching. In terms of fit problems, the sleeves fit like wings and the bust is pretty good. The cowl neck could be more cowl-like. More room in the hips would be good.

20171106_153025 20171106_153049

In terms of sewing, it’s not my best work. The cowl was difficult to get in and there is something weird with the side seams.

20171106_153037 20171106_153039

And yet the times I have worn it, I really loved wearing it. Just goes to show that a garment doesn’t need to be perfect for you to enjoy wearing it. It’s a super comfy top and I just love the colour of it. The length is perfect for wearing with jeans. Overall I feel pretty great in it even though I know there are fit problems and sewing problems.

Go figure.

Burda has the usual sparse instructions so this top isn’t for the faint of heart. You just sort of have to “interpret” their instructions or go your own way like I do 90% of the time.

Speaking of 2017 Make Nine, I’m on track to get five out of the nine done. Way better than my 2016 Make Nine where I made exactly zero of the things I planned.

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Here is my #2017makenine Except for the middle column, these are @burda_style patterns. I made a goal to make more Burda patterns since I love the designs and think the block fits me pretty well. Plan is to make at least these 6 this year starting with the grey sweatshirt using some cat print terry I have. In the middle column, I want to make a maxi length @cashmerette #appletondress with some lovely tropical fabric I recently acquired in a swap. I love #M7537 from the @mccallpatterncompany early spring release. I can see it becoming a quick favourite. Finally, I have a bunch of flannel in my stash that is due to become pjs using the free pattern from @5outof4patterns If I bust that stash, I clear out an entire shelf of my stash! And I get many cozy pjs to wear about the house in various lengths for the year. Last year I didn't get any of my list done. This year feels pretty reasonable and should be doable. ūüėĀ #sewing #sewcialists

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I think the summer dresses just aren’t going to happen, but the pj pants and the kimono robe will for sure. I finished my Appleton dress, Burda sweatshirt and now my Burda cowl top. I would love to get the top left corner Burda dress done sometime this winter. I have fabric for the other Burda dresses, but it doesn’t seem to make sense to make summer dresses when there are leaves on the ground so those will likely be pushed over to my 2018 Make Nine list. The McCall’s dress fell off my to make list. I ended up buying fabric for M7624¬†instead. Hahha oops. I hope to make view¬† C or D depending on how much I can squeeze out of the fabric at some point during the winter.

I’m just not sure that both of those dresses will happen in 2017. They may be muslined in 2017, but not finished up.

TL:DR Review

  • Pattern: Burda cowl neck top (10/2011#135)
  • Pros:¬†Even though it was tough to put in, the separate pieces for the back neckline and the cowl make for a nice shape and lovely finish. I really like the relaxed fit and with some tweaks it would be perfect.
  • Cons:¬†The usual sparse instructions issues for Burda patterns.
  • Make again?:¬†With some nice drapey rayon knit and a few fit/style mods. I would increase the cowl width and try to figure out how to adjust to get rid of the flaps of fabric in the sleeves above the bust.
  • Rating:¬†pink-star-black-md¬†pink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdwhite-star-black-md4/5 stars

 

Blank Slate Patterns Barton Shorts

Shortly after I was done pattern testing the Oceanside shorts, Blank Slate put out a call for testers for the Barton shorts. I really wanted to test them, but ended up not because I was testing a different pattern at the time. I got the Barton Shorts later with a gift coupon Blank Slate gave me for testing the Oceanside shorts. Win win!

I got a lovely linen rayon fabric from fabricville and some cotton lace. I made a 3XL and compared the crotch curve to my Oceanside shorts and made adjustments for that (full butt adjustments and a bit of shortening of the front crotch curve plus a bit longer length). The other change I made was to use 1 inch elastic instead of 1.5 inch elastic. I’ve confined my rant on that to my TL:DR review at the bottom.

They fit perfectly when I first sewed them…

An Accidental Capsule Wardrobe

My husband took this photo in Niagara Falls. Then the shorts got put in the dryer and they shrunk a bit overall. Unfortunately, they ride up now when I walk and are tight in the butt now. They were just perfect in Niagara Falls. The cotton lace shrunk as well and the hem flips up a bit. Oh well, lesson learned. I will be washing and drying linen twice next time since my green Oceanside shorts also shrunk a bit. I still love the shorts and wear them far too much! I’m definitely going to make more.

Overall, I like the Barton Shorts more than the¬†Made with Moxie Prefontaine Shorts¬†that I made last year. I prefer the side seam pockets and the shape of the side seams more. The Barton Shorts were also a better fit for me and sit more comfortably for me. The size range is also better for the Barton shorts. I’m at the top for the size range, but at least I didn’t have to grade them up!

An Accidental Capsule Wardrobe

An Accidental Capsule Wardrobe

An Accidental Capsule Wardrobe

An Accidental Capsule Wardrobe

An Accidental Capsule Wardrobe

An Accidental Capsule Wardrobe

An Accidental Capsule Wardrobe

An Accidental Capsule Wardrobe

An Accidental Capsule Wardrobe

TL:DR Review

  • Pattern:¬†Blank Slate Patterns Barton Shorts
  • Pros:¬†Lots of options for the hem (lace, bias tape, etc) and the length.
  • Cons:¬†Decent size range, but being at the top means that it won’t be a good option for people bigger than me. Maybe it is just me, but I find when a pattern recommends 1.5 inch elastic it’s pretty unnecessary. I have tons of 1 inch elastic in my possession always and most patterns use 1 inch elastic for shorts and elastic waist pants. The Misty Jeans also have 1.5 inch elastic and I’m just like… why?! Maybe it is a Canadian thing that 1.5 inch elastic isn’t available everywhere and is so much more expensive when I can find it, but dang it…. I just hate 1.5 inch elastic. The Oceanside shorts use half inch elastic and that drove me a bit bonkers, too. I changed that to 1 inch elastic as well. I just don’t know… I am probably being too picky about it, but damn…I just want 1 inch elastic. In the long run, it’s an easy adjustment to make to patterns, but I just don’t really get using the wider elastic. Okay, done this weird elastic rant…. LOL
  • Make again?:¬†Definitely. I’ll probably make a couple PJ versions since I love kicking around the house in these. I think the shorts would also be a great gift!
  • Rating:¬†pink-star-black-md¬†pink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdwhite-star-black-md4/5 stars

Cashmerette Webster Dress

I loved the look of the Cashmerette Webster Dress when it was released at the beginning of the summer. I’m not super sold on it on me, though, for a few reasons. I like my finished product, but there are fit issues so I don’t love it.

I don’t expect a perfect fit out of the package for any pattern, though. I do think it could work well once the fit issues are resolved. There are a couple of changes I will make to the construction and my plan is to make a hem facing or use bias tape for future hems. I always have issues with curved hems and find them so much easier and neater with facing or bias tape.

I had a ton of construction issues when I was making it. My machine has been having tension and feed issues for a while now and the seams kept slipping for the dress hem. There are extra pieces for the bottom to colour block and make the hem long enough for a dress. My machine hated seam matching so much. I ripped back a few times and still it isn’t perfect, but the busy print hides it. Originally, I’d also tried to put pockets in, because I cannot live without them. The shaped side seams make that impossible so word to the wise don’t try it. There is a reason the dress doesn’t have them.

I serged the seam allowances for a nice inside finish. I do this with all my garments now. Unfortunately, it stretched out the v-neck a bit. The fabric is a super soft cotton voile. Drapey and lovely. I do think the dress would work better with silk or rayon for a bit more heft. I am going to try another version (top length, screw seam matching with my temperamental machine) in black rayon.

If that weren’t enough, I installed one of the back skirt panels in the wrong way! I decided not to rip it back and just cut the hem a bit higher. I think with my sewing if one thing goes wrong with a garment, it tends to just keep going wrong. Most of the things I sew go really well, but occasionally one thing is just cursed.

Finally, there are a few minor fit issues. I need to lower the bust dart by a couple of inches. Like my Springfield and Upton dresses, I need to do a bit of armsyce adjustments and either add a dart there (the method that works a lot better for me) or rotate out that fold of fabric above the bust (I’ve tried this with both the Springfield and Upton and it didn’t work as well for me as just having a dart). I did some adjustments to the length of the straps crisscrossing on the back. I need to make some adjustments on the back since it is slightly tight. I’m thinking of using the next size up for the back. I may need a bit of a sway back adjustment as well. Other than that, it fits as expected.

I added belt loops and a tie for this version since I wasn’t keen on how it looked when I did a fitting. I think the top version is probably what I will be making for future.

Overall, I like my finished dress. I am not in love with it, but I do love it with the Three’s a Charm Jacket I made. It will get some wear to work in that look.

An Accidental Capsule Wardrobe

An Accidental Capsule Wardrobe

An Accidental Capsule Wardrobe

An Accidental Capsule Wardrobe

An Accidental Capsule Wardrobe

An Accidental Capsule Wardrobe

An Accidental Capsule Wardrobe

An Accidental Capsule Wardrobe

TL:DR Review

  • Pattern:¬†Cashmerette Webster Dress
  • Pros:¬†Lovely shaped sides for curvy people. High/low shaped hem. Cups. Good size range. Nice crisscross detail on the back and I love the facing (even if it was a bit tough to put it due to my diva machine).
  • Cons:¬†Not really a complaint to the pattern, but having no pockets makes it tough for me. But I get why there aren’t any since mine were a disaster. LOL. Dress length doesn’t work great for me. It might work better in a rayon fabric that is heavier than this cotton voile, though.
  • Make again?:¬†I will for sure make the top version, but I might not revisit the dress version.
  • Rating:¬†pink-star-black-md¬†pink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdwhite-star-black-md4/5 stars

Simplicity 8137 Wrap top

Disclaimer:  I received this pattern free of charge in return for a review on the CSC. All my opinions are my own. 

Today, I am sharing my thoughts on Simplicity 8137 in a navy blue crepe lined with black rayon. The pattern includes a top, dress (knee length and full length), and pants. I made the top. I was given the pattern for free as part of Curvy Simplicity Week on the Curvy Sewing Collective. My review appeared on CSC yesterday.

Simplicity 8137

I made a size 28W and did very few adjustments! 

I narrowed the shoulders by 1 inch and did a large bicep adjustment of 3 inches as well as adding 1 inch to each side seam in order to give adequate room to the armscye for the bicep adjustment. After doing a quick tissue fit, I figured an FBA wasn’t necessary since the princess seams crossed the apex in the correct location, but narrowing the shoulder and a large bicep adjustment would be necessary.

This is actually the least I’ve done for anything I’ve sewn up in a while from the Big 4. Simplicity patterns aren’t widely available in Canada due to a pricing dispute between the major distributor and Simplicity. The shipping/duty charges tend not to make ordering from the website manageable¬†so this is only the second time I have used a Simplicity pattern, but after seeing how few adjustments I needed for the plus sized pattern, I will be asking my US friends to send me a couple of patterns in the future. I also have a few in my pattern stash¬†that¬†are probably going to go up in my sewing queue now!

Edit: Turns out the shipping costs have gone down significantly since the last time I was looking a few years ago. But the currency conversion and higher cost/lack of sales/duty charges are still an issue and overall it is more inconvenient to order online rather than buy locally.

20161024_172137

Simplicity 8137

The construction process went okay. The instructions were a bit…lacking. I looked over them several times, but didn’t see where it referred to actually sewing up the lining before you sew the lining to the bodice or sewing the side seams. They aren’t the kind of instructions for a beginner to follow, but I was okay. The pattern doesn’t have a difficulty rating, but I would place it in advanced beginner simply based on the instructions. With better instructions, there is nothing at all complicated with the design or construction and a beginner could complete it, but the missing parts would confuse them.

I decided to save time and not slip stitch the lining at the waist by hand during construction and simply treated the lining and main fabric as one piece in attaching the peplum to it. It worked out just fine, but is maybe not as neat of a look as the design intended. I finished all my seams on the serger.

Simplicity 8137

 

I think the pattern fits pretty well!¬†I do think it tends toward being wide and low in the v-neck. For someone who works in a conservative setting, this is a slight issue. I felt more comfortable wearing a camisole underneath the top as it does go quite low. The wrap top is fixed by snaps and the ties don’t actually have much function beside a design feature and a bit of cinching in at the waist. They don’t pull in the fronts as much as traditional wrap tops where they are affixed to the ends of the bodice and slipped through at the waist. That makes the construction a lot easier since they are sewn in at the side seams and waist but it doesn’t help keep the bodice v together like traditional wrap top designs. ¬†I think the wrap design is great for my body shape and would work for a lot of people since it goes in at the waist and flares at the hips adding a nice curve. Overall, the fit is really good¬†except for the low front.

Simplicity 8137

I will make this again for sure. I will probably add another couple of snaps to this version to cinch in the front and make the v-neckline a bit less revealing. In future versions, I will raise the neckline, as well as add in extra snaps so that the v shape stays in place. I can see this becoming a staple in my wardrobe in both the top version and the dress version. I doubt I will make the pants, though, since my hips do go beyond the 28W sizing and I don’t really wear pants anyway. I can also see how this top would look nice with a pencil skirt or even a circle skirt on the bottom. So, it works quite well with my wardrobe.

I can see this becoming a wardrobe staple for me and think you’ll be seeing a full length dress version on me in the summer next year!

Simplicity 8137

 

TL:DR Review

  • Pattern: Simplicity 8137
  • Pros:¬†Design is super flattering due to the princess seams, ties, and the flare of the peplum.
  • Cons:¬†Instructions were lacking a few details and the v isn’t as cinched in as I would like it.
  • Make again?:¬†Yesabsolutely. I will add more snaps as well as raise the v for modesty reasons. I love a good revealing top, but my work environment is a bit conservative for that.
  • Rating: pink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdwhite-star-black-md4/5 stars

 

Made with Moxie Prefontaine Shorts

Today I share with you my Made with Moxie Prefontaine shorts. I made them before my Upton maxi dress, but they have been constantly worn since. There are a few patterns like this one out there, but for some reason, these struck me as the ones for me. If you are looking for a similar pattern that is free, check out Purl Solo’s City Gym shorts¬†(goes up to 46 inch hip). ¬†The Prefontaine shorts, however, go up to a 55 inch hip and have pockets. I could have graded up the City gym shorts and altered them for a pocket, but I decided to go with the Prefontaine shorts. I’m glad I did.

Shorts are a continuing mission for me. I need to break that scarrier (a barrier you are scared of…lol). This year is all about fashion challenges to myself and conquering fashion scarriers, because of what people and magazines told me growing up.

Shorts are a scarrier for me. I haven’t worn them in public since I was in my teens and the last time I wore them…I had some mean girls at school make fun of my legs for being fat and super duper white and pale. I guess they were making fun of my entire fat body, but I was wearing a flowy peasant top a la mid-90s¬†with cut off jean shorts so that translated to me hating shorts. I immediately went home and tossed the shorts in the garbage and never wore them again. My legs also become a huge object for my hatred after that. I’ve been pretty honest about my struggles with mental health. My legs were a target for self harm for most of my teen years until about 21 when I stopped harming myself for good. YAY ME! Ridiculously proud of myself for how far I have some in uh…almost 15 years.

Shorts are still a scarrier, though. They are a big part of me healing myself and saying “eff you, bullies of the past!” and healing the mental health scars internally. With all my health issues, I can’t change my body very easily so it is important to me that I embrace it and love it and work past these scarriers. 2 weeks ago, I posted this on Facebook and IG:

My body does great things on a daily basis just trying to keep my joints from flying off to Nantucket. I have to appreciate it for that and for how it helped me my whole life. Sure I will still curse every time I have weird things happen like dislocating my shoulder by putting on a bag. But it’s the only body I have. So I embrace its flaws and appreciate its strengths.

Shorts and trying out different dress silhouettes (tent dress, maxi dress) is really important to me. Next one is a two piece swimsuit to get into the pool for exercise.

Back to the Prefontaine shorts.

The thing is that I’ve made them, but there is no way I would or could wear these shorts out in public unless I was at the beach or back from the gym. They are a lot more like pajama shorts than I originally anticipated. That is totally okay, of course, pj shorts with pockets are an amazing thing and I will have tons of these, but I was looking for a nice short to wear around the city and feel confident in. On reflection, maybe a loose-fitting pair of shorts was never destined for that, but I didn’t know unless I tried.

The fit on the Prefontaine shorts isn’t really what I was hoping for. I graded up to a size 28. I could definitely have just done a size 26 or maybe with the ease tried the size 24 since my hips are 56 inches (to 58…depending on the time of the month) and the size 24 is for 55 inch hips. I think the ease might be a little bit more than the pattern suggests. For size 26, it should be only be a couple of inches of ease, but my shorts measure at 62 inches. Edit: the size chart is also not very detailed. It is more detailed with the finished measurements than anything else. So the ease for a 26 could be correct, but it’s hard to know without a complete size chart. It could definitely have been my grading, though. I’ll for sure be making the pattern again, but¬†I will try sizing down next time. The butt fits okay, though, so even if I do size down, I want to keep the crotch curve almost as is on the back with a slightly larger adjustment. I’m not a huge fan of how the front looks. I have a shorter front crotch curve, which I discovered while making my Misty Jeans, so there is fabric pooling and pouching. Not the greatest look at all! Sizing down may help, but I also plan on shortening that curve for a better fit. I love the pockets, though, and the bias tape edges. It makes for a fun around the house short.

My main reason for not wearing them outside of the house is the potential for the crotch to ride up as I walk and for me to get chub rub. The shorts aren’t super functional unless they stop me from chafing. Around the house, they are fine, but I need something functional for walking. If I were to make these for outside shorts, I would have to lengthen them to cover my thighs, but I think I really just want to make a bunch of these for pj shorts for around the house.

I already have the Jennifer City Shorts from StyleArc cut out, but I just got the Itch to Stitch Belize shorts for a shorter short since the Jennifer City Shorts hit about knee level. The other plus of the Belize shorts is they seem to have a higher waist, which I much prefer. I also love the elastic back with the flat front and the skort version, but I don’t think that will be my first version of them. I’d prefer to try to get the fit correct and I think I might be lazy with the skort since that would just cover it up. I will need to grade the shorts up to a size 26.

And now here is a mini-rant. I know that plus sized women often aren’t the market for shorts, but there is a serious lack of patterns for them in bigger sizes. Shorts are becoming more popular in plus size fashion. I wish for two things: 1) that sewing patterns would hurry up and meet fashion trends so I can sew them and 2) that sewing pattern companies were more adventurous with their options. Release all the plus sized crop trops, short shorts, tank dresses, bodycon dresses, swing/tent dresses, sleeveless everything, and lingerie, for god’s sake, give me PLUS SIZED lingerie patterns! I just want more options and to get past more and more scarriers so that other women like me look at how I am rocking it and say, “hey, I can do that too!” or maybe they get past a different scarrier. End rant.

And back to some details on the shorts. They are made with a midweight soft as heck purple cotton that I bought years ago during a Fabricland closing. The hot pink bias tape is from a local shop. I recently learned that I have access to way better bias tape than 90% of the world. The stuff in packages is apparently what most people have, but my local stores actually make bias tape with their cotton fabric so you can match the bias tape perfectly to the cotton solids colours available in their shop. The bias tape isn’t a poly/cotton blend, but a nice cotton. It’s prices comparably to the stuff in packages. So now I get why people say they hate purchased bias tape. Before I was all “this is a good alternative.” But now I realize my privilege in having access to much better bias tape. There are higher qualities and 100% cotton bias tapes in the packages, but they aren’t everywhere like the scratchy poly/cotton stuff.

Even though most edges would be finished in the bias tape, I also finished them with my serger.

Construction went okay. I was watching Stephen King’s The Mist while making them. I’ve seen that movie about 20 times and got reminded of it while recently devouring Stranger Things on Netflix. People who have seen both can understand a bit of the correlation with Stranger Things in my mind. Even though I’ve seen the movie a lot, certain things distracted me. I won’t spoil it, but it’s a really good movie imho. The ending in the movie is controversial for book fans and even for movie fans, but I think it’s a good cinematic ending and it kills me every time. Basically, the movie is emotional, scary, and a great psychological trip.

But….it’s not good watch while you sew material…

I sewed the pockets to the front crotch curve during a particularly tense scene. So that happened. After ripping that out, everything was fine. The instructions are really clear.

I wore the shorts with a new Concord tank top with cotton lycra covered with cats in crowns. How much better can a shirt get?! Here pictures of me without makeup or having done my hair at all and I pretty much don’t care! I kind of love them. You can see the wicked hot pink and purple argyle KT tape on my shoulder that my Physiotherapist put on me. She gets me. She said she would have offered most people the black stuff, but not me. ūüėČ

Concord T-shirt and Prefontaine Shorts

Concort T-shirt and Prefontaine Shorts

Concord T-shirt and Prefontaine Shorts

The elastic in the back isn’t twisting or anything, just wasn’t sitting right for the picture. Too lazy to retake it!

TL:DR Review

  • Pattern:¬†Made with Moxie Prefontaine Shorts
  • Pros:¬†Nice deep pockets (I made them deeper in this version, but I am going back to the original length for the next pair because they are good as is). Bias tape edging is a great design detail. Lots of ease for a casual pattern.
  • Cons:¬†Not wearable in public because of potential for crotch riding up. But that’s a personal thing. Might have more ease than the pattern suggests.
  • Make again?:¬†Yes.¬†I want to size down, decrease the front crotch curve, and leave the back crotch curve as is in this version. If I were to wear these in public, I would lengthen them, too.
  • Rating: pink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdwhite-star-black-md4/5 stars