The Wedding Dress, pt. 3: The Reveal and the Day

When I was growing up, I never had an idea in my head of a wedding. I never had it in my head that I would get married at all. If my Barbies or dolls got married, it was usually a lesbian wedding and involved unicorns and dragons. It usually ended in complete destruction of the world I had set up, because fairy tale weddings always had the bride carried away by a dragon, right?

I’m happy to report that my actual wedding had no such conclusion. It was perfect.

I already revealed the dress, because I was too excited to hold back the dress for me to write a post. Instagram was also filled with pictures of our wedding. A lot of our wedding was DIY and I wanted to go over a few more details from the week leading up and the day and then tell you about our awesome minimoon in Niagara Falls.

Decorations for the wedding reception were created by my friend Rob and I. The night before we went to the space and got everything pretty for the day of.

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Each table had a paper table cloth and a tissue paper flower with a tea light in the centre. The stage, where we put the head table, had a string of lights and tulle, as well as balloons covered in tulle and tied with ribbons and fake flowers. These balloons also appeared throughout the space, as well. We also had little paper wedding bells above the bar.

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This was the prototype we created for the wedding. They weren’t helium-filled, but were hung from the ceiling with clear fishing wire.

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Here I am playing with a wedding decoration after a few. ūüėČ

Dale and I made the favours for the wedding reception, as well:

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We gave a little DIY Yahtzee game with dice and little pencil along with a bunch of candy: York peppermint patty, Hershey’s Hugs, Maple toffee, Tootsie Roll, and a Chocolate Loonie. Totally random candies from a bulk store.

Our ceremony was a mix of non-traditional and traditional. We are not religious but we chose to do a handfasting, which is a Celtic and neopagan tradition.

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We felt connected to the significance of having our lives bound together physically and symbolically through marriage. Our parents each bound our hands and then tied a knot together. We wanted them to take part in the ceremony in some way even if it wasn’t a traditional giving away of the bride by the father of the bride. In this way, our two families are connected by the bond they created by raising us and blessing our union.

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Our vows were a little different from the usual to have and to hold for richer and for poorer. Helen Sweet, our amazing officiate, had a lovely set of vows that fit with who we are with each other:

I, Andie, choose you Dale as my spouse, to be no other than yourself.¬† Loving what I know of you, trusting what I don’t yet know; With respect for your integrity and faith in your abiding love for me; In all that life may bring us, I join my life to yours.

While I didn’t cry all the way through the ceremony, my voice caught in saying these words and looking into his eyes.

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And then we made out. Fully encouraged by Helen, who said she wouldn’t tolerate anything less than making out.

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And the ceremony ended with a family hug with the kids. A perfect way to end it.

Here are some post-ceremony pictures:

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Our ceremony took place in Allan Gardens Conservatory in the main atrium under the banana tree. It was an important place for us as our family pictures took place there a few years prior.

Helen Sweet, our officiate, was booked through All Seasons Weddings. She was an excellent speaker and truly wonderful to work with. We adored her.

Our reception took place at Social Capital Theatre, where we perform our monthly show, Holodeck Follies. It was catered by KAMA Restaurant, Indian buffet, with a late night pizza snack from Panago Pizza.

For our wedding cake, I made a small gluten free vanilla cake with blueberry coulis and vanilla buttercream. To match our gold colour, I dusted the top with gold sugar dust.

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Nerds with Guitars played our wedding with excellent covers and some original songs.

I’ve purposely kept a lot of people out of the pictures and focused on Dale and I. I won’t post pictures without permission from individuals. I do want to give you an idea of my neice’s dress, though, so here is a detail of the back.

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She was truly adorable in the dress and such a sweetie. She was pretty pleased to be able to take the dress home and be able to wear it to school for special occasions.

Here are some fun pictures from the reception enjoying the music and having fun.

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Our day was absolutely perfect in every way possible. It was wonderful celebrating our love in our own special way.

We were lucky enough to be gifted a Scandinavian and Russian cruise from Dale’s family for the wedding through Celebrity Cruises. Along with that, people were incredibly generous and gave to the Daily Bread Food Bank and gave us enough for a mini honeymoon in Niagara Falls and spending money for our cruise. We’ll be going on the cruise in May 2016. Tons of time to sew up a vacation wardrobe!

In Niagara, we spent some time being tourists and visited the midway, the falls, went on the boat under the falls, visited a wax museum, went to the bird kingdom, and got old timey pictures taken of us.

Here are some fun highlights from our minimoon:

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Gunslingers:

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Thanks for reading!

Sincerely,

Mrs. Andie Wells

Read the full series:

April: The Wedding Dress, pt. 1: The Design, the Muslin, the Fabric, and the Outfit

June: The Wedding Lingerie

The Flower Girl’s Dress and Sash

July: Wedding!

The Wedding Dress, pt. 3: The Reveal and the Day

 

The Wedding Lingerie

Well, my plans for the lingerie ended up all over the place. I did make the bra and I will be making the camisole, but left out the tap shorts and the underwear. I just didn’t want to fiddle with the bottoms and have been feeling stressed by it and not wanting to do it. Instead, I bought some white stretchy shorts with lace on the bottoms and some lace underwear to match my bra. I will blog about the camisole another time and include a review. The pattern I am using for the camisole is the Savannah camisole from Seamwork mag. So, this post just includes my bra. Oh the grand plans that come down to one thing while I co-plan a wedding…

The Bra:

Since making my cloned Elomi bra, I was pretty psyched to get to making another bra with the tweaks to the pattern. Before making the bra for my wedding, though, I had to make another test bra.

From the last bra, I shortened the band, narrowed the bridge, increased the lower cup and accounted for the stretch in the lace for the upper cup. I also shortened and narrowed the straps.

Outside:

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Inside:

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The “test” bra is in fuchsia duoplex, black powernet, and fuchsia elastics/findings from Bra Maker’s Supply and black and fuchsia stretch lace from a local store. The fit is almost perfect. The band ended up tighter than I expected, but still okay. Not uncomfortable unless I eat a big meal. The bridge still doesn’t sit flat in this version. It’s a little difficult to understand how this bra works in the flat version. The stretch lace is narrow at the top so the bra looks like the straps are close together. On me, however, they are in the correct position. To give you an idea of that, I put the bra cup on a balloon:

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It’s hilarious to me that the balloon is still not big enough for that cup and I still find the cup a little small…

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Unfortunately, the lace in this version got a couple little holes in it when I washed it.

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The other thing I realized was how bulky the bottom cup seam is where the powernet of the band and the duoplex/lace of the bridge meet. I doubled the powernet in the band, which also meant that the bra was more supportive, but I also doubled the duoplex in the bridge, as well, to ensure the support there, too.

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Super bulky seam that I didn’t trim down. The sewing is less than stellar in that area. The problem with sewing with duoplex and powernet and lace is that ripping out seams is almost impossible without destroying the fabric so I left it. My technique only gets better with every bra so I know this will be remedied in future versions.

The other issue I seem to have with the sewing is in the straps:

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The straps are sewn to the powernet with a double lightening stitch. This one is actually better than my wedding bra version, but you can see that I didn’t quite catch the powernet in the second row. In spite of using pins, the three layers move about a lot. I need to figure out how to improve my technique there. It works, but I am worries about the longevity of the bra in that area.

The other thing to note is how narrow the bridge is:

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The underwires actually overlap in this area, but I have no issue with comfort from that.

For my wedding bra, I left out the lace on the bridge and made sure I clipped the seams to reduce the bulk. I clipped one side of the doubled duoplex and powernet so that I was only sewing over one of each within the 1/4 inch seam allowance. I also further increased the lower cup and the upper cup. I decided not to increase the band, but I have done it for the next version, including increasing the upper cup and lower cup again. Geez, how big are my boobs?!

You can see the seam is much smoother on this version:

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This version is an even better fit. The bridge is almost flat against my breastbone (only a 1/4 inch out now). I haven’t spent a lot of time wear it, because I am saving it for my wedding mostly. I did wear it for a day last week to make sure I wouldn’t have a problem for my wedding day, though. It fits will and is very pretty. The only issue is I derped and put in the hook and eye wrong so I will be fixing it this weekend, because I can’t hook it very well this way since I am used to the other way.

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Here are more balloon pictures:

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You can see that the cup is even bigger in this version, because of the bagginess in the cup against the balloon.

Here are some lovely detail shots:

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Oh and the crappy job I did on the straps (even worse than the last time!):

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The interesting comparison here is this bra to the original cloned one:

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It’s pretty similar in terms of length.

Here are all my cloned bras so far with the most recent on top:

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I feel like they are getting a lot better with every step. I’m really pleased to see my skill increase. So much more room to grow (damn straps), but it’s getting there.

From here, I basically want to make all the bras. I will hold off for a while, though…cuz wedding…and see how these wear. I have enough materials for another two bras minus one pair of wires. Then in the future, I’m hoping to try foam bras and bras for my swimwear plans.

Also in the series:

April: The Wedding Dress, pt. 1: The Design, the Muslin, the Fabric, and the Outfit

May: The Wedding Dress, pt. 2: Construction and Details

June: The Flower Girl’s Dress and Sash

Stay tuned for:

July: Wedding!

The Wedding Dress, pt. 3: The Reveal and the Day.

The Flower Girl’s Dress and Sash(es)

I’ve been hard at work trying to get a million things done by the wedding. It’s 22 days and 5 hours away!

First up, I made a bunch of sashes: one for me, one for my sister’s bride’s maid dress, one for the bouquet, and one for the hand fasting ceremony. Phew.

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Look I made a sash puppet! For my sash and my sister’s I used the pattern piece for the tie from M5314, a out of print woven wrap dress. I used it for the first dress I ever made with a pattern. I want to revisit the pattern again someday, because I absolutely loved that dress. It was a little bit revealing, but was originally made for a burlesque show so that was a good thing! It’s now a wrap skirt and I still love¬†it.

For my sash, I cut two pieces of the pattern piece instead of one and I lengthened it. The tie for the dress is super long already, but I wanted to be able to make a bow and still have the ends hanging almost to the bottom of the skirt. I also like the pointed ends for my sash. Pictured here with some of the wedding decoration prep:

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See how long it is?

The prep for the wedding decorations is for balloons at the reception:

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They are wrapped in red tulle and have a fake flower and ribbon tied around them. They are hanging with fishing line so we don’t have to bother with helium. My friend Rob came up with the idea from a Pinterest post and then helped me put it together. He’s my expert decorator and an all-around fabulous guy!

For my sister’s sash, I followed the pattern and cut one and then folded and sewed. Instead of a point at the end, this sash has a diagonal cut. My sister’s sash is half the size of mine in width and a lot shorter. Below, you can see that the sash isn’t even half the length of mine.

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For the bouquet and the handfasting sashes, I just winged it. They are both the same size with a diagonal end mirroring my sister’s sash.

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I think I’ve talked about the sashes enough. Who really cares about triangles of fabric?

The flower girl dress is the star of this post!

I started with the Sweetheart Dress Pattern from Very Shannon. My niece is five years old so I cut the 5T. Although, I asked my sister to measure Grace just in case and she falls between 4T and 5T. I chose to cut the 5T for comfort, because the finished measurements are fitted across the chest.

The pattern pieces are so tiny!

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Cutting out kid’s clothing is a completely different experience. I made Grace pj pants for Christmas last year and was so confused how teeny tiny they were. I thought it must be impossible that a five year old is that small. The pants were a little large on her, though! I don’t think I mentioned the pattern for her pj pants in that post, but it was the Avery lounge pants from Livi Stitches. It was an okay pattern. My only criticism was that it doesn’t have standard size cuts for the elastic in the waistband, but instead says to use your kids as a model and wrap it around their waist to get the length. Great if you have a kid right there. Not so great if the kid you are sewing for is 1600+ km away. A google search gave me standard sizes so I used those.

My sister and her family live on the East Coast so there is no chance of checking the fit on this dress until the week of. I’m not worried, because kids are pretty easy to fit and my sister gave me Grace’s measurements.

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I have to say that I can’t really make any comment on the instructions in this pattern as I didn’t look at them very long. I sort of just followed my own methods for the self-lined bodice and heart cutout. I think I glances at them to understand how the heart cutout worked and that was it.

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It came together really easily. Tiny bodice plus gathered skirt. That was all. I probably had more trouble with the tiny proportions than with the pattern itself.

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It’s a very cute dress and will look very adorable on Grace. She has gold sandals to match the wedding colours. I added a gold button at the back to match the colours, too.

I won’t rate the dress since I haven’t seen how it fits Grace yet, but I tentatively give it 5 stars, because it’s incredibly cute and was easy to make.

Wedding prep is all-consuming now. I haven’t had much of a chance to think of anything else. Although, I have sketched out some summer sewing plans and cut out another M6696 and another cloned bra (in fushia this time). I will also be cutting out a camisole for underneath the wedding dress. I’m using the Savannah pattern from Seamwork¬†without any lace at the neckline. Should be a quick make. I am also making little shorts in silk using the shorts portion of the Parisian Nights PJs from Winter Wear Designs. I’ve made them up in flannel before and I just have a few modifications to make and then make a waistband for it. Should also be an easy make. If I have time, I will make a beige bra and some matching undies, but honestly, if I don’t have time or I feel stressed, I’m not going to go to the trouble.

Our basement/my sewing room has a water leak issue from the window. I might have to move everything upstairs so my landlady can deal with that. Also, it smells horrible in there. A combination of wet dog from the carpet, mold, and dead spiders, I assume. Makes for some unhappy sewing, but I have too much to do to stop now!

Edit:

Forgot to include this silly picture of me in a tulle wig!

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Also in the series:

April: The Wedding Dress, pt. 1: The Design, the Muslin, the Fabric, and the Outfit

May: The Wedding Dress, pt. 2: Construction and Details

Stay tuned for:

June: The Wedding Lingerie

July: Wedding!

The Wedding Dress, pt. 3: The Reveal and the Day.

The Wedding Dress, pt. 2: Construction and Details

As promised, I’m writing about the construction of my wedding dress and showing you some details of it. Unfortunately, you won’t get to see the final product until after the wedding in July.

I’m very excited about the wedding and have started counting down on facebook and sending people messages. By the time the day is here, I may have some annoyed friends/family, but I can’t keep the excitement down.

Wedding planning has been a breeze and my fiance has been amazing. I’m so happy I get to marry my best friend. ‚̧

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On to the dress!

Construction of the dress took about 5 weeks and had a few setbacks. I did make other things during this time, though, and took breaks when I reached a setback. I took Tanya’s advice to heart and took it slow with the construction. I probably cut and sewed it in about 20-24 hours in total. I’m going to go over a few things I did for the construction, the setbacks, and show you detail shots throughout.

Cutting out the dress

When cutting this out, I had no problem with the bodice pieces. The size of the skirt pieces was larger than my cutting table, though, and I had some unfortunate slipping during that which didn’t get noticed until later. I’ll get to that later in the setbacks. Silk definitely needs a flat surface for the entire pattern piece. I ended up fixing the problem, but if I ever do something this elaborate again I am going to cut on the floor. Not ideal, but silk is a slippery ***.

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Hand basting the lace overlay

Hand basting the lace on to the silk was a lengthy process and a little frustrating because of the slipperiness of both materials and the lace’s ability to snag and pull if you looked at it wrong. I did this on four bodice panels and the cap sleeves. It made sewing those pattern pieces a lot easier, though, as the lace didn’t shift in the process.

Testing before sewing

I did a lot of testing before I sewed it on my actual dress pieces. The testing included:

Stitch length and tension:

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In choosing the stitch length and tension, I was looking for something that didn’t pull on the silk and was flat and tidy.

Button holes:

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In choosing the button holes, I was looking in particular for a hole that laid flat once it was cut open and had a shape I preferred. I also wanted a stitch length that would work to prevent unraveling of the silk fibers when buttoning up the dress.

Seam finishing:

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I always had it in my head to finish with hug snug, but I tested it out using the stitch length and tension from my testing, as well, to ensure it worked for the extra layers.

Hem finishing:

All hems were finished with hug snug. I chose not to hand sew a blind hem for the skirt, but instead do a machine hem. I just preferred the look and how it draped. I originally was going to do a rolled hem but my rolled hem foot didn’t like the silk….or liked it too much because it nommed it to hell.

I made sure that things worked before I sewed the dress. Silk charmeuse is very delicate and my lace was pretty prone to snags/pulls and neither¬†enjoyed seam ripping. I wanted to make sure that I wouldn’t have to do a bunch of that…although, I did have a bit of it…. :/

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Bodice

I had the bodice done relatively quickly minus the arm finishing and cap sleeves. The insides were easy to finish with hug snug. I did have some issues with the hug snug on the front princess seams, though, but that was worked out by narrowing the seams and then resewing the hug snug.

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Skirt

The skirt was a setback. As I said, the skirt pieces slipped during cutting and I never compared them to the pattern pieces to ensure they were cut correctly. I sewed them up and then sewed them to the bodice and then I put the dress on a hanger and my heart fell.

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Things were wrong:

1) The skirt side seams weren’t going straight down. They were angling back to the back of the dress.

2) The skirt side seams weren’t draping properly and were puckering near the hips.

3) The skirt hem was allllllll over the place: long in the back, short at the side seams, long in the front.

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I put the dress in the naughty corner and I thought about other things for a little bit. I compared the skirt pieces to the pattern pieces and realized the issue: not cut properly. I think the dress sat for about a week and then I unpicked the waist and skirt side seams. I recut the skirt pieces and then sewed the whole thing again. The side seams still pucker slightly at the hips, but are greatly improved.

Cutting the skirt for the hem was a whole other ordeal. I let the skirt hang for 48 hours and then I laid it on the floor and measured from waist to the 23 inches I wanted for the hem and marked blue dots all along the hem. I then pinned the entire hem up and tried the dress on to make sure it was even. I tried it on with the crinoline and without it. Then I hemmed the skirt.

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As a result of the cutting problem, the skirt ended up shorter than I thought it would be. My crinoline peaks out at the bottom, but I have to say, I am quite pleased with that look. It’s so pretty. Maybe not proper, but I love it so screw proper.

Buttonbands and collar

The buttonbands and the collar all have a lightweight interfacing and are all sewn with a handsewn slipstich in silk thread on the inside. It made for a really delicate and lovely finish. I worked hard to get my stitches really even for the that.

I marked the buttonholes 2 inches apart and sewed on 12 buttons with the silk thread in Xs.

I really love the buttons and how they compliment the lace.

There is a bit of floppiness in the button band and collar on the left side, but I am hoping that spray starch will solve that.

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Cap sleeves and armholes

I sewed the cap sleeves on and then discovered a set back: they were too small. The armscye was too small as well. I recut the armscye and then made an adjustment to the cap sleeve pattern piece and cut out new cap sleeves. I then finished the arms with hug snug on the inside. Unfortunately, the delicate fabric didn’t enjoy all the work in those areas and I am concerned about some larger holes from needles.

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The armscye also ended up too large so I had to add in an armscye dart to pinch in that area. Not the neatest dart, but it is just under my arm and won’t be noticeable.

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Silk organza underskirt

In order to offset the heaviness of a circle skirt with such a delicate fabric, Brooke suggested adding an underskirt of silk organza. I made it about 18 inches long and sewed it to the skirt at the waistband and at the button bands. I did have a draping issue at the button bands with the underskirt and skirt pieces not draping together correctly. I had to recut the skirt piece a little and that fixed the issue. The underskirt also had a wonky hem because of cutting… :/ It’s still not the greatest hem, but works fine for under the skirt.

The waistband was then finished with two pieces of hug snug with all the layers of fabric. I was originally going to use grosgrain ribbon, but opted for the hug snug again instead. It makes for a nice finish.

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Cleaning the dress

If you ever ever ever decide to work with this type of white silk for anything at all, do yourself a favour and clean up your iron before hand. It was not so clean for this and then I had to wash my entire dress to get rid of black waxy stuff from my iron from interfacing glue and etc.

I hand washed it and then put it in the washing machine for a rinse and a spin while at the same time my heart was spinning!

It came out beautifully and only one black smug didn’t come out during the process, but it was on the inside of the button band. I got it out after the fact, though.

I actually have a new iron now, because that one overheated and melted a bit of fabric. Hopefully, the self-clean option on the new iron will work.

I still have the sash to make out of red satin. I’ll put that into my next post in the wedding series.

Next Up:

The Lingerie and I will share the flower girl’s dress, as well.

Also in the series:

April: The Wedding Dress, pt. 1: The Design, the Muslin, the Fabric, and the Outfit

Stay tuned for:

June: The Wedding Lingerie

Also in June: The Flower Girl’s Dress and Sash

July: The Wedding Dress, pt. 3: The Reveal and the Day.

The Wedding Dress, pt. 1: The Design, the Muslin, the Fabric, and the Outfit

The Design:

When I first started researching what I wanted to make for my wedding dress, I came up with some very similar pictures. All of them had a sweetheart neckline and an overlay of lace or mesh. I eventually found Simplicity 1606 and had grand plans of making it in a combination of pink and white and burgundy accents.

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I want to add cap sleeves to the dress and I want a fuller tea-length layered skirt. This is my inspiration dress:

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I made the muslin and was not happy with it. You know those pinterest fails?

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Yeah, it felt like that…

So, I went back to the drawing board. Okay…the pinterest boards¬†and started pinning gorgeous shirt dresses.

Everyone knows I love a shirt dress! There is no better piece of clothing to wear than a shirt dress with a flared skirt.

I felt like a wedding shirt dress could be my dream wedding dress. I still wanted a full tea-length circle skirt on it. I got McCall’s 7084 around Christmas time and really loved the princess seams, flared skirt, cap sleeves, and the lace overlay in view C.

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All I needed to do was lengthen the skirt and do an FBA on the bodice.

The Muslin

The muslin process went incredibly well for this dress. I did pattern tissue adjustments and only created one muslin. Sorry just cell phone pictures for this process. I made a 2 inch FBA with size 22 using Mary’s method¬†for princess seam FBAs. The FBA added 4 inches in total to the finished measurements for the bust and 6 inches to the waist. I also did a 1 inch narrow shoulder adjustment. Then I lengthened all of the skirt pieces by 4 inches. I further lengthened them by an additional two inches when I cut out my fabric.

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My muslin fit was amazing. The princess seams are perfect and there is no pulling across the bust where the buttons will be.

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Some tweaks in the collar had to be made (reduced the length of the collar stand by an inch in total), but other than that the muslin was perfect and truly felt like it was meant to be. After twirling around in the muslin, I decided to redraft the skirt from¬†panels and godets into a full circle skirt do reduce the amount of seams I would need to make in the delicate silk and because I wasn’t sold on the look of the godets in a solid colour. It wasn’t difficult to cut the skirt pieces in three panels and I ended up using the muslin skirt itself as a pattern piece when I cut into my fabric.

The Fabric

I went back and forth and back and forth and did tons of research and visited tons of fabric stores and looked endlessly online for this and that and the other thing.

Getting me to settle on fabric was a difficult process, but I wanted it to be right for me.

I started off not wanting white. I started off wanting dusty rose and having burgundy or wine accents. I then thought maybe champagne with burgundy. Ultimately, I just drank a bottle of wine and clicked buy.

My main fabric is a white silk charmeuse from Dharma Trading. Dharma Trading sells wholesale dyeable fabrics in white or black along with fabric paints and dyes and many other things. I ordered samples from several different places. My samples from fabric.com were pretty disappointing. They were synthetic materials and I really wanted a silk charmeuse, because I’ve worked with it before and it sews like a dream, feels amazing next to the skin, and has a lovely drape that makes me so happy. The samples from Dharma Trading did not disappoint. I also got a few others at the time, as well, and might order again in the future. Dyeing my own fabric is definitely on my list of things to do in the future. I also got a few yards of silk organza from Dharma Trading, as well. You’ll find out what I used that for in my construction post.

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I was originally going to dye the white silk using tea or coffee to make it a champagne hue, but then I got an adorable “no” from my fiance who said he never gets to see me in white and that he really loved the idea of being traditional in that way. I was fighting hard against traditional things and I still am, but my fiance’s look was so sweet… I couldn’t say no. I never really do say no with him. It’s so difficult when he is so cute and dreamy and wonderful. *swoon*

Now that you’ve stopped gagging, I’ll go on about my fabric.

My lace fabric is from fabric.com. It’s not the best quality lace out there and is stretch lace, but it’s quite lovely as an overlay on the silk. I will be hand basting it to the lace to make sure it doesn’t move during the sewing process.

I have a synthetic cranberry satin for the waist tie. I didn’t want to use a silk for something that will be pulled and tied and possibly stepped on by family as they swoop in for hugs and kisses. I also got enough to make my sister a sash as one of my bride’s maids.

Finally, I got white rayon hug snug to bind the seams from fabric.com. My wedding dress will be pretty on the inside and on the outside.

I also ordered a lace in a pink blush from fabric.com for the lingerie, which I will talk about in a different post as I plan it out.

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I’ve now got the whole dress cut out and ready to sew:

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Creating the Outfit

I ordered was a tea-length petticoat crinoline in ivory from ReShashay. They are made of nylon organza and netting. They come with instructions to decrinkle them in the shower. It worked really well. The ivory looks quite lovely under the white silk. I originally ordered the crinoline during the champagne coloured fabric phase, but am still happy with my decision to keep it as ivory. It looks very cute under the white silk.

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If you are ever in the market for a crinoline, I really love the one I have and would definitely recommend it to other people. I could have gone through the process of making my own, but damn all that gathering and all that fabric can’t really be beat with a $36 price tag. Saves me time/money!

My shoes were also back and forth in my head. I wanted pink….red…..white…….etc.

I settled on gold and kept pinning all these lovely gold shoes. I looked into custom made ones (which were way too expensive for me) and then one day while at the mall I walked into Call it Spring and fell in love with these two matching pairs:

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The wedge heels were $40 dollars and will be worn during the ceremony. I’m not really a heel person (although, I could actually walk in these ones comfortably!) so I figure at some point I will want to burn them and put on cute flats. I picked up gold flats in a similar material¬†as the heels for $35.

And, of course, I couldn’t resist finding buttons that matched (I have 12¬†buttons in total):

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I have no plans yet for jewelry, hair/nails, or the bouquet. It will all come together eventually. ūüôā I’m a pretty relaxed Bride-to-Be.

Next Up:

Sewing the dress, of course.

Stay tuned for:

May: The Wedding Dress, pt. 2: Construction and Details

June: The Wedding Lingerie

Also in June: The Flower Girl’s Dress and Sash

July: Wedding!

The Wedding Dress, pt. 3: The Reveal and the Day.

I promise I will be using the DSLR from now on so that you can see the details really well and don’t have to contend with shitty cell phone pictures.