Style Sew Me Nikki Blazer

When @naturaldane and @onesewsweet announced the Black History Month Pattern Designers Challenge, I was excited. I wanted to try Style Sew Me patterns for a while and what a perfect time to do it. I got the Nikki blazer pattern and the Alise top, which is a current work in progress.

I used a green ponte knit for this version. I made the largest size and used smaller seam allowances. Mostly because I was worried that the sleeves wouldn’t fit but that wasn’t an issue; I should have just measures the pieces but I guess I was feeling lazy at the time. Even with the seam allowances as recommended and not in a knit fabric, it seems like the sleeves would be fine. Also, another thing about the sleeves is they are 2 piece sleeves. I adore a 2-piece sleeve.

I made no alterations for this version. The fit is okay, but for the next versions, I will shorten the bodice by about 2 inches, and add a bit more flare to the back skirt piece. I know that the sleeves are about an inch too long, but my preference is that they are longer so it’s unlikely that I would change it. A note that in the pictures, I am holding my remote so my hands disappear in a lot of the pictures. The sleeves hit about 1/3 or 1/2 of the way into my palm so a bit long but I like it that way.

I didn’t line this version since the knit is sewn on my serger and all the insides are finished anyway.

In terms of instructions, the pattern actually has very few. But there are youtube tutorials on it and the other patterns so anything that isn’t clear in the instructions is understood through the video tutorials.

I have already made a second version of the blazer. For this one, I added a bit more flare to the back peplum as sort of a faux full butt adjustment. I shortened the bodice by 2 inches. I do think that I could use a narrow shoulder adjustment but I keep forgetting and it’s not bothering me too much. The fabric is antique gold coloured faux leather and cotton lycra for the side panels and under sleeve due to fabric constraints. I hemmed the blazer with Heat N Bond Super hem and it is holding nicely in place. I also used the Heat N Bond to give a nice crisp edge to the collar pieces.

I made this one for the Day and Night Dress Challenge.

I also made my tassel necklace and the clutch (although to be real, the clutch isn’t quite done since it still needs lining and I haven’t found the strap I want to use for it.

The theme this year was to take a dress that you have in your closet that you don’t wear that often and make things that complete a day look and a night look. This Cashmerette Rivermont is actually the opposite of the dress requirements. I wear this one so often that I needed different looks for it. Mission accomplished.

The clutch is the Seamwork Valencia. It’s made with purple leather and green suede. Both of these are my first projects with faux or real leather aside from some leather patches on a jacket that I made ages ago. The sewing could be better on the Seamwork Valencia, but it could also be worse. Thank goodness for past me getting a teflon foot for my sewing machine. Also thank goodness for an amazing sewing machine with the Singer Heavy Duty 4452. ❤ Oh and I will be posting my review on the machine soon since it’s been a year with it.

The Valencia needed some piecing since the purple leather I had was a small remnant. The clutch has a magentic snap. Part of the reason I am also waiting to finish this is that the holes I cut for the magentic snap were cut a bit big. I think it will be okay but it would benefit from some reinforcement behind the snap just to ensure the hole doesn’t get bigger. I’m procrastinating on doing that. But I’m also not sure about the lining yet. Do you ever hesitate on small details like that? I even had a lining all ready and then went to put it in and was all….nope I don’t like that. I’ll figure it out. I might have to visit a remnant bin or two. Oh no fabric shopping! hahah.

I definitely don’t think this is my last leather/suede/faux leather project. I really want to make a small backpack with a combination of tan and more of the hunter green suede. We’ll see when I get around to that. I still haven’t found the perfect pattern for that.

TL:DR Review

  • Pattern: Style Sew Me Nikki Blazer
  • Pros: Princess seams in front a back, nice shaping. The sleeves are actually generously sized and didn’t require a large bicep adjustment at all.
  • Cons: I can’t think of any cons! My length issue is because I am short, but that’s a common adjustment and easy adjustment for me.
  • Make again?: Definitely. I want a woven version next!
  • Rating: pink-star-black-md pink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-md5/5 stars

TL:DR Review

  • Pattern: Seamwork Valencia
  • Pros: An easy project for a first leather purse.
  • Cons: No cons really.
  • Make again?: Probably not. I don’t know how many clutches I would need!
  • Rating: pink-star-black-md pink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-md5/5 stars

Top 5 2018 and #2019MakeNine

Every year, Gillian of Crafting a Rainbow hosts a Top 5 blog series for bloggers to reflect on their top 5 hits, misses, highlights, reflections, and goals. It’s a fun blog series and I’ve done it now for a few years.

In years past, I had a bunch of charts showing what I made and the breakdown of patterns companies and types. I started off this year logging that in a chart, but abandoned it in March because I realized that I didn’t need to make as much as I had previously. I’ve sort of reached a point with my wardrobe where I don’t need a lot and can slow down in sewing for myself. I know for sure that I didn’t make as much this year as previous years, but for good reasons.

I did manage to not add a bunch of new fabric this year. I did keep track of my fabric stash. I started the year off with 416 yards of fabric and ended the year with 376. Might not sound like a huge difference, but let’s compare that with the difference in 2017: started with 236 and ended with 416. WTF, dude?! No wonder my husband started looking at me like I had a problem. After organizing and going through my stash, I also managed to purge about 4 more yards to make it 372 yards in my stash. My best month for stashbusting was March for a total of 40 yards busted! My worst month was July where I did sew up 13 yards, but also bought or acquired through trades…. 25 yards of fabric. Most months, though, I did use up more than I bought. Win!

Top 5 Hits

Cashmerette Cedar Dolman with Long sleeves and Hem band

Simplicity 8096 crop top and pleated skirt set

Simplicity 8344 bodysuit

DIBY Club Gabriela Onesie

Simplicity 8140

It’s so difficult to choose just 5 hits. I loved them all. Over the year, though, I’ve grabbed these so many times and been sad when they were in the laundry hamper waiting to be cleaned. I’m even wearing Simplicity 8140 right now and have another version of the Cedar Dolman with long sleeves planned as well as another Gabriela Onesie cut out.

Top 5 Misses

Simplicity 8084: This one is just a tragic story of being in Cuba and getting it caught on a cup holder on a bus and ripping it asunder. I almost cried. I do have fabric to fix it, though, so I am hoping it will have a happy ending.

Cedar Dolman Long ruffled sleeves: The fabric just didn’t hold up for this one. I wear it around the house now.

McCall’s 7624: This is a failure of interfacing. There are ripples in the interfacing on the coral bands after one wash so it doesn’t look as crisp and neat  as it should.

Burda Knit Blazer: It’s a failure of fit here. I like it, but find that the proportions are just too long on me.

Cedar Dolman dress: OMG can I please stop spilling a million things on my dresses? I just wear this around the house now, but even without the stains (yes, multiple….lol) the skirt should be wider for this and overall I don’t really like the shape of these sorts of dresses, I’ve decided, after wearing several that became around the house dresses.

Top 5 Highlights

The Festival of Wizardry was so much fun! I loved making all the things for it and it was such a blast being there!

Drafting a bralette from scratch was a great highlight. Expect more of these soon for an exciting new adventure for me this year!

Perfecting the fit of my bra and redrafting it to have front and back closure was a huge game changer!

Getting a new and super amazing sewing machine! It has no issue with tons of layers of fabric!

Getting back into reading! Since I dropped out of my PhD in 2013, I had found reading really emotionally painful. My PhD was in English Lit and reading turned from a source of joy to a reminder of a really painful experience academically. I didn’t drop out without thinking it over a lot and weighing the options. There isn’t really a choice of picking up where you left off with a PhD so I knew it was the end of academia for me. It was a great choice for my mental and physical health to not have that in addition to working full time, though, but the heartbreak was real and it cut deep. I spent the year with a goal to read 15 books and I achieved it. I also found joy in reading again. I also bought a kindle since reading physical books was painful for my hands. Reading brings me such pleasure now. 🙂

Top 5 Reflections

  • I made it through the year without a single Emergency Room visit! This is huge for me! I have had at least one ER visit for the past several years, but this year was zero. I’ve spent the year really listening to my body, being careful with my joints, and getting better care for my breathing issues. I had a respirologist appointment recently where we celebrated a good year of getting my chronic cough under control with medication. I am so happy I switched respirologists last year because I am honestly doing so much better than last year at this time.
  • I haven’t been constantly sewing for myself like previous years. I got paid to sew for a few people as well as creating costumes for my troupe. I’ve also made gifts for people. I’m pleased with this balance! I love creating for myself and getting the confidence from clothes that fit, but I don’t need a huge wardrobe so creating for others is a great way of still being able to sew. 🙂
  • Having a community is a huge thing. I am so pleased with how @chronicallysewn has grown and where I see it going in the next year. I really treasure the friendships I have made through it, too! ❤
  • The QAPD Collective is also a great community locally for LGBTQ people in Toronto who love to laugh either as an audience member or a comedian. My husband introduced me to it and I have been grateful to be a part of it. I’m actually even performing standup now! My next show is at the Up + Comers at the Rivoli on Jan 29th!
  • I stopped using the term “hack” as much as possible since it started to get to me with it’s connotations. I design pattern changes… I don’t hack things apart with an ax and I am not a hack or faking it. Design not hack.

Top 5 Goals

  • I am spending the next few months learning how to draft lingerie patterns! I’m excited for this new venture and it’s been something I have wanted to do for a long time. My bralette was drafted by just sort of winging it, but I don’t want to do that going forward. I am learning the technical aspects of creating patterns and grading them. However, because of my chronic illness, I decided to do this not in the classroom but from books and online courses. I’m used to self-directed learning since graduate school is all about that. Yes, you have courses, but your own research is directed by your own self. I’m good at keeping on track for that kind of learning so I expect this will go well. I’ll be posting about this over the next while so you will be able to see how it goes!
  • Get paid. I once said that I never wanted this hobby to turn into a job. Well…. that has changed. I’m at a point where I would prefer to work from home rather than deal with a 9-5. This would fit much better with my chronic illness. The previous goal is a bit related since pattern companies often restrict use of their patterns for objects for sale. Not all are like that, but I’d rather not breach that. Quite frankly, I also prefer designing my own things and would love to be able to create things from measurements rather than make the pattern fit the person.
  • Learn more about wholesale fabric in Canada. If anyone knows about this, let me know. I’d like to understand the wholesale costs of fabric here rather than the retail costs to really be able to cost out anything I sell.
  • Share my experiences with you! Maybe I will lose the interest of some of my readers with this, but some might be fascinated by all this like I am. I also want to make the blog a bit more of a priority. I have fun writing so I want to do more of it.
  • Be more creative. I really want to go nuts this year with super creative projects and learn more skills like dyeing fabric or beading. I plan on having fun this year with my personal projects and creating some amazing statement pieces.

#2019MakeNine

  1. Ottobre coat Autumn/Winter 2017: I plan on adding a fake fur trimmed hood to it (possibly detachable). I have some lovely light blue wool to use. I will interline it with thinsulate to make it super warm.
  2. Cashmerette Chilton Trenchcoat: When my sewing machine died earlier this year, I was actually testing this pattern. I have it cut out already and the lining sewn up in the tester version. I just need to compare to the final version and make some changes.
  3. McCall’s 7726: I have some raspberry tencel twill already purchased for view D of this pattern.
  4. Burda Off the Shoulder Sweater: I plan on making this ASAP in some hacci knit. If I like it, I will probably make two versions in different colours.
  5. Burda Oversized Blouse: I just love this blouse!
  6. Burda Spencer Jacket: This jacket rocks and totally fits in with my goals of making some statement pieces.
  7. Decades of Style Dorothy Lara dress: I will need to grade this pattern up, but it shouldn’t be too difficult. I love the style of it and hope it looks as cute on me as it does on Tanya. I have some watermelon fabric that I plan on using for it.
  8. Blank Slate Patterns Marigold dress: This pattern was recently expanded for larger sizes and I love it. I have some red floral fabric for it.
  9. Seamwork Magazine Arden dress: I plan on shortening this into a top and using some sheer red poly crepe with white polkadots for it. I will need a camisole for underneath it, too.

For my #2018MakeNine, I only got 3/9 finished and the year before I think I got 1 or 2 done. I hope to get at least 5 done this year if I can’t achieve it all.

 

Simplicity 8344 Bodysuit

I haven’t worn a bodysuit since the early 90s. Back then, I had one or two that I wore all the time. I love them. Then I started getting a stomach and was told to conceal it with baggy tops that weren’t tucked in. At 12, I was being given the worst fashion advice ever: you can’t show confidence if you are fat.

Fast forward to now and I am all about tucking in my tops and don’t care if they are curve-hugging. At 37, I show my confidence like crazy.

I wanted to try a bodysuit again. I’m all about revisiting and unlearning bad fashion advice that didn’t include wear whatever you want. I wear shorts now because of that.

I also really wanted to try the shoulderless or off the shoulder trend that I am late to the game for… So I knew I needed to make view E or F. I chose this lovely liverpool knit that LA Finch Fabrics sent me (edit: along with a bunch of other knit fabrics in a bundle) when I won the #letssewthistogether challenge for May, Summer Whites. I am not a huge fan of liverpool knit, but this is definitely one of the best quality liverpool knits I’ve come across. It feels a lot nicer than any of the others I have used and it sewed up better than the others. My main issue with liverpool knit is that the prints are printed on white backing which sometimes shows through when you are sewing or if the garment stretches too much in a particular area. This knit does do that but at a higher stretch than most other liverpools I have used. Liverpool knit is also mostly polyester and can be really hot to wear…hence being perfect for a shoulderless top so I can breathe!

LA Finch sent me just over a yard of the liverpool knit so it was pattern tetris to get this to fit with some smart changes to make use of the fabric. I just squeezed this into one yard by cutting only half of the sleeve in the liverpool knit and then lining it with some white poly knit I have as well as using the white knit for the leg bands.

The back is cut in two pieces and the the back centre seam provides some lovely shaping. I really like it. It might still need a bit of a swayback adjustment, but it’s pretty close and seems to have a bit of a swayback built into the pattern.

The pattern went together really well. The instructions were pretty clear. I did make a few changes. I added straps to conceal my bra straps so I can wear a regular bra with it. That’s always been my issue with the off the shoulder trends. I am not making a whole new bra pattern just for it! I also didn’t use snap tape but instead sewed on a strip of bias tape and then sewed snaps to that. The snaps I have are big heavy duty ones so they work well and don’t unsnap from stretching. The whole bodysuit can actually slip on from the bottom since the neckline is so wide. That helps bunches with my bad shoulders. I call this a win for my accessibility.

Fit is good. I made 28W with my 50 inch bust and graded to a 30W at the hips for my 54 inch hips. The liverpool knit doesn’t have a lot of lengthwise stretch so the bodysuit feels a bit snug lengthwise. Not really an issue with my short torso but something to keep in mind for others to have a knit with good 4-way stretch. I mean…the pattern says that, but when you get it in your head to use a specific fabric…well….. haha.

TL:DR Review

  • Pattern: Simplicity 8344 Bodysuit
  • Pros: I love the final result! I think the size range is great. I am glad to not be choosing the biggest size for my bodysuit!
  • Cons: I don’t think I have any cons. It’s a nicely constructed pattern!
  • Make again?: YES! I love it. I’m still sort of deciding whether I want to change it to a top, though, since it’s not the easiest garment for bathroom emergencies even with the snaps. lol.
  • Rating: pink-star-black-md pink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-md5/5 stars

Cashmerette Ipswich Swimsuit

This post was originally on the CSC for the Curvy Year of Sewing Bodysuits and Swimsuits theme.

Today I am reviewing the Cashmerette Ipswich Swimsuit. I did also test the swimsuit before release but my opinions are my own. There were some changes made between the version we tested and the final version so for obvious reasons this review it based on the final version.

The pattern has two views: view A is a one piece swimsuit and view B is a two-piece swimsuit. The size range is size 12-28 with cup sizes C/D, E/F, and G/H; bust 40 inches to 58 inches. I chose to make view B for this review. I prefer two-piece swimsuits as they make bathroom trips a lot easier in the middle of swimming and they are easier for me to put on and take off with my disabilities. The pattern also has an internal wired bra that is optional. I chose to make it with the internal bra since I have experience making bras.

My measurements are 51.5 bust, 44 underbust, 46 waist, and 55 hip. I chose to make a size 22 G/H. I could have graded to a 24 at the hip but I chose not to do that and it worked out just fine except in one area which I will get to a bit later.

  

The fabric I used is nylon spandex lightening print and black poly spandex with black swimsuit lining and black bra foam as well as powernet for the bra band and black duoplex fabric for the bra bridge (duoplex is a stable polyester fabric used in bramaking). There are a lot of notions for this suit: swimsuit elastic, stable elastic for the straps, swimsuit clickers for the back closures, underwires, and underwire channeling. Phew. You can make the swimsuit without the internal bra and that definitely cuts down on the amount of materials, but you might not get the support you need. If you do choose to do that, I recommend using powernet to line the front as well to give a bit more support. Powernet should still be used in the back as well as directed.

In terms of construction, swimsuits are definitely not for beginners. Cashmerette lists the pattern as intermediate and it definitely is for that level. The pattern instructions are great and very detailed. There is also an online course for it, but I haven’t tried it out. There were some construction methods that I didn’t prefer. For the most part, however, those were personal preferences based on what is easier for me.

In terms of fit, there are a few issues. First off, this pair is my second pair for the bottoms. The first pair I made were a lot lower rise due to my belly and bum. I raised the pattern by 7 inches. However, I took about 3 inches away after construction. In total, there are 4 inches added to both front and back using the lengthen/shorten lines. They fit a lot better for me this way. You may need to make adjustments for a larger belly or bum.

 

The leg holes are finished by attaching elastic and then flipping it to the inside and topstitching over it using a stretch stitch. For my next pair, I will used bands with elastic enclosed in them. It’s my preferred method and tends to feel a bit more secure.

The top fits okay. I am going to narrow the neckband a bit since my shoulders and upperbust are narrow. This will help stop that wavy/loose bit at the centre of the neckband.

The bra does not fit me well. For people who are familiar with bramaking and have a bra pattern that fits well, continue to use that for your swimsuit, any swimsuit. I haven’t made a bra in over 2 years so I didn’t have that option and I wanted to see how the pattern bra fit me. There definitely needs to be more room in the cups for me. I am spilling over and the wires are lower than the should be instead of following my breast root. The shape of the cup works okay, but I definitely need more projection. Everyone’s needs are going to be different here so if you don’t have a TNT bra pattern, start by trying it out and then tweaking from there. I will need to do quite a bit of tweaking to get this one to fit well but it’s definitely going to happen.

Word of caution, though, for anyone pursuing the internal bra is to not expect a 100% great fit out the package. As with all bramaking, fitting is the hard part. Don’t use your super expensive material on that first one. Muslins for bras and swimsuits are a bit more expensive, but completely worth it.

I made one tweak for this version instead of following direction and used band elastic on the bottom of the top. For me, it helps keep the bottom in place a bit better and is firmer than the swimsuit elastic.

 

Overall, I really like the design and plan on making it again. I’d love to make the tankini using the free expansion pack. I also want to play with cutouts using powermesh or tweak the neckline into different looks.

TL:DR Review

  • Pattern: Cashmerette Ipswich Swimsuit
  • Pros: I loved the pattern. I think there are definitely fit issues (as there would be with any swimsuit pattern) but overall there are more wins in terms of support for the bust and fun use of pattern mixing with the panels. The instructions are great as usual with Cashmerette. I definitely need to get a better fit in the bra and tweak a bit more here and there, but I’m not far off from a great fit.
  • Cons: I do think that the neckline could be a bit more flattering. The boobs do look a bit like a single block. I plan on tweaking that a bit.
  • Make again?: Absolutely! I am working on my bra pattern and then I will get more foam so I can use it for the internal bra.
  • Rating: pink-star-black-md pink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-md4.5/5 stars

 

Striped Simplicity 8342 top

I made Simplicity 8342 tie top as a result of Tasha’s many versions of it. Of course, Tasha and I have very different body shapes. But I also saw Jasmin Lucero post her version of it on instagram as well and figured that I could make it work for me, too. Both inspirations make this a bit of a Sew Style Hero nod to both Tasha’s and Jasmin’s lovely styles. ❤

 

I knew I would need some adjustments to the length of the top since my bust is larger than average. Even with the pattern going up to a 28W or a 50 inch bust, I knew that it wouldn’t quite fit perfectly the first time.

I lengthened the bust cups by about 3 inches for this version. I made the mistake of also increasing the size of the ties. Basically, I was lazy and instead of doing pattern adjustments, I just made the adjustments as I was cutting it out. Silly me. Especially since I was low on spoons and in lots of pain.

I solemnly swear I will do my pattern adjustments properly next time. 😉

 

The bust fits….okayish. The underbust doesn’t hit quite at my underbust so I need to do a proper bust adjustment for the next time that doesn’t change the tie at all. Although, the tie being that big does cover my bra in the cutout so that is good. I am also thinking of adding some elastic on the underbust seam so it sits better. The straps are in the right location and the back comes up far enough for my bra to be covered. I need some more room in the hips/stomach for sure. It looks good tucked into my chore skirt but not ideal otherwise. The shirt length would be better a bit longer as well.

 

The fabric I used is a cotton lycra purchased locally. I have more of it left so I am thinking of completely remaking the top again with the adjustments.

I definitely don’t hate the top. I actually really like it, but it’s not a good fit just yet. I think I will feel better in it when I redo my bra pattern to be lower. Right now, the bridge of my bra pokes up above the tie.

Some more adjustments plus a better fitting bra pattern and I think this could be a winner for the summer.

TL:DR Review

  • Pattern: Simplicity 8342 tie top
  • Pros: Okay size range. Love the vintage style.
  • Cons: The pattern would be greatly improved by including cup sizes, but that’s my only complaint. I guess I am spoiled for patterns with different cup sizes. 😉
  • Make again?: Absolutely! I also want to tackle those cute pants some day.
  • Rating: pink-star-black-md pink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-md4/5 stars

 

My Sew Style Hero: Shannon from Rare Device

I originally posted on the Sewcialists blog about this project, but I definitely wanted to also post here, because Hello my blog needs this post too! I also have a bunch more pictures to share.

I chose Shannon from Rare Device for my Sew Style Hero for many many reasons.

  1. I love her style. She has a knack for great colour and fabric choices. The things she wears always look great on her and embrace trends like crop tops, wide legged pants, etc.
  2. She plays with gender in her style. Something I used to do a lot, but haven’t done in recent years since I started sewing for myself. It is something I want to do again (I even have a button up shirt cut out!) with a focus on making things that are comfortable for me to wear given my physical disabilities.
  3. She started Sew Queer and that prompted me to start Chronically Sewn to help highlight sewists with physical and mental chronic illnesses.

Speaking of style, Shannon is known for her crop top and flowing skirt or pant sets, either matching or mismatching. She is actually just finishing up another set using a monstera leaf print that makes me super envious!

 

I looooove the look, but I had never tried a crop top before in my life. What better time to overcome a fear of releasing the mid-drift?

I went through my stash looking for a fabric that would be perfect for the set and had just enough of a lovely soft cotton tropical flower print. For the crop top, I chose the bodice from the Simplicity 8096 dress view A.

To the Simplicity bodice, I added a band at the bottom and elastic through the band. I also added a button band at centre front and cut the back on the fold eliminating the zipper back there. The entire top unbuttons from the front and is incredibly easy for me to get on and off with my physical constraints. It’s incredibly comfortable.

 

I made the skirt without a pattern. It’s just a simple pleated skirt with pockets and a button band. The look above on the far right of Shannon is the look that inspired mine. The skirt is cut a bit shorter due to fabric constraints. I am also much shorter than Shannon so it actually looks the same length on me!

A big floppy sun hat completes the inspiration look!

   

And I actually feel incredible in this look! Crop tops are some kind of wonderful.

   

I love the purple buttons I got locally for both the crop top and skirt. They look great with the floral print. The skirt could be a bit tighter. I may actually put some elastic across the back after I run it through the wash once to see whether the fabric shrinks a bit. To add the elastic, I will just open up two spots along the waistband at the back and then run some 1 inch elastic through and tack it down. That should do the trick.

  

Thank you, Shannon, for all that you do for the sewing community. You are an amazing Sew Style Hero!

 

DIBY Club Gabriela Onesie

Originally published on the CSC.

Do you have a sewing bucket list? I’m slowly making my way through mine. Basically, it’s a list of things that I want to sew at some point in my life. When I first started sewing years ago, things like sewing my own bra, swimsuit, pants, coat were on the list. I’ve made it through a lot of that list, but I still have a lot on my bucket list. Sewing a onesie may seem like a strange thing to put on a sewing bucket list, but it was for sure on mine. For anyone who knows me, they know I love some really strange things fashion wise. I really wanted to make a onesie. They look comfortable, fun to wear, and great for lounging around the house. Plus, a good pattern might be useful for some cosplay opportunities and you know I love cosplay!

Do it Yourself Better Club reached out to the CSC a few months ago asking if we’d review some of their patterns in exchange for a free pattern. A few of us leaped at the opportunity. When I saw the Gabriela Onesie, I asked to review it. The pattern goes up to a size 36, which translates to 63″ full bust, 59.75″ waist, and 67″ full hip. It’s a pretty generous size range. A few years ago it was tough to find a onesie that even went up to a 45″ hip let alone a 67″ hip. It’s great to see a company have such a great size range. Of course, there can always be more done in that area, but I was pleased to not be at the top of the size range and to see that some of their testers looked like me! Visibility is meaningful.

I chose a size 22 graded to a size 26 at the hip. I also shortened the top at the waist and hip lines by a total of 4 inches. The total height of the pattern is 5’5″. I am 5’3″ but I have a shorter torso so I measured myself in a few spots and decided to reduce the torso by 4 inches. I made no other changes to the pattern.

The fit is actually pretty good in the front. I can even put my arms over my head without creating a camel toe which is a huge success I think for a onesie. The back does require a slight full butt adjustment, but no change in the overall length of the torso since there is no issue at the sides just that slight wedgie it’s giving me. Haha. Since I chose the capri length, I am not sure whether I will need to shorten the full length version; although given that the capri length is just above my ankles, I likely do need to adjust the full length version. DIBY Club does give the inseam length of 30.5 inches and since my inseam is 26 inches, I would be able to guess that I need an adjustment for the inseam as well. Just goes to prove that although I am only 2 inches shorter than the height the pattern drafts for, our bodies are complex and often require additional measurements to get the right fit.

I’m thoroughly impressed with the information DIBY Club gives its customers as well as the extensive instructions they provide. On one level, as an intermediate sewist, I find the sheer number of pages to print a bit ridiculous, but on another level, depending on your skills, the instructions are very useful, especially in terms of fitting the pattern to your body. I think for most beginners that skill is so difficult to learn and DIBY Club helps you with that. I followed their instructions for blending between sizes and shortening the torso length as well. It was very useful.

Construction-wise there is nothing to complain about. Every notch matched up well and I didn’t have any trouble following their instructions for the zipper or for any part of the onesie. It went together fast.

Now let’s talk logistics with a onesie, because I haven’t worn one as an adult so I had no clue what to expect….except for all the hilarious cartoons on going to the bathroom in a jumpsuit…

I haven’t worn overalls or a jumpsuit either since my early 20s. This onesie gives me an idea of what that would be like since those types of patterns keep on trending. I chose to make the functional bum flap thinking it would be easy to use. I have velcro on it to close it. Let’s just say…reaching around to open up the velcro and close it again is NOT easy. Add on to that, my chronic illness makes my shoulders dislocate easily so I abandoned using that pretty darn quickly. The alternative is using the zipper in front and effectively becoming naked every time I am wearing the onesie. The nice thing is that I am just at home and we don’t have little kids opening the bathroom door anymore to ask for things (although, my stepkids never really did that thankfully!). Phew. Logistically, onesies are a little bit awkward… That being said, they are so comfortable. It’s wonderful to not have waistbands.

Future versions won’t include the functional bum flap since I couldn’t even use it.

Let’s talk fabric. This onesie called for French Terry, jersey, 4-way sweatshirt fleece or sweater knit. Knits with at least 50% stretch horizontally and 20% vertically. I got some really awesome Disney princess cotton lycra from Funky Monkey Fabrics and used some solid pink bamboo knit that I got locally for the contrasts on the cuffs, pockets, and bum flap. Cotton lycra tends to be pretty expensive here in Canada especially if you are going for licensed prints. These are definitely the most expensive pjs I’ve ever made. The awesome thing is that they are probably going to become my most worn pjs ever and hopefully will last a bit. I have some of the jersey left and plan on making some pj shorts with it and a tank top in the pink bamboo knit for a matching top.

All in all, I am confident that I will be making this pattern again for pjs. I’m not sure about going forward to adapt it for cosplay purposes due to the awkward bathroom situations…. But I’ll never say never! I mean I think most people who cosplay in onesies wear an undershirt and some kind of shorts under…

TL:DR Review

  • Pattern: DIBY Gabriela Onesie
  • Pros: Great size range. Incredibly easy to follow instructions. Comfortable to the max!
  • Cons: Butt flap not so functional for me but that is my weird bendy/fall apartness. So many pages to print. Maybe save some trees and use a digital copy of the instructions…
  • Make again?: I already have some wicked unicorn cotton lycra that my mom bought me for another version. ❤ ❤
  • Rating: pink-star-black-md pink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-mdpink-star-black-md5/5 stars